Corruption

This Week's Corrupt Cops Stories

Police Corruption (STDW) - Wed, 08/15/2018 - 19:13

[image:1 align:right caption:true]A Mississippi sheriff is in a heap of trouble, a Mississippi prison guard gets caught with contraband, and more.

In Oakland, Mississippi, the Tallahatchie County sheriff was arrested last Friday on federal drug trafficking and extortion charges. Sheriff William Brewer, 58, is charged with conspiracy to distribute a controlled substance and extortion and bribery under color of official right in violation of the Hobbs Act. He's looking at up to 20 years in prison on each count.

In Brandon, Mississippi, a state prison guard was arrested last Friday after being caught with a cell phone, marijuana, and synthetic cannabinoids as she reported to work. Guard Kimberly Diana Scott, 35, went down when a regular search turned up the contraband. She is charged with introducing controlled substances into a correctional facility.

In Polkton, North Carolina, a state prison guard was arrested Monday for allegedly trying to bring drugs into the prison. Sgt. Casonja Crowder, 34, is charged with felony conspiracy to deliver marijuana and suboxone to an inmate and felony possession of marijuana and suboxone. She has now resigned her position.

Categories: Corruption

This Week's Corrupt Cops Stories

Police Corruption (STDW) - Wed, 08/08/2018 - 21:34

A small-town Ohio police chief ODs on drugs he stole from his own department, a veteran Baltimore cop gets nailed for peddling pills, a TSA worker goes down for participating in a cocaine conspiracy, and more. Let's get to it:

[image:1 align:right]In Kirkersville, Ohio, the cause of death for the Kirkersville police chief was announced on Monday. Chief James Hughes Jr., 35, died of "acute fentanyl intoxication" after using drugs he stole from his department's evidence room. Police searching his home found packages of heroin, fentanyl, and LSD strewn about his living around, as well as three syringes, one containing traces of a powerful opioid, and another containing fentanyl.

In Oklahoma City, a now-former Cleveland Police volunteer reserve officer was arrested July 27 after being caught with nearly 160 pounds of marijuana. Terry Browne, 33, was fired immediately after being arrested. He now faces drug trafficking charges.

In Baltimore, a Baltimore police officer was arrested last Wednesday on drug trafficking charges after Baltimore County police officers observed him making a drug deal in a suburban parking lot. Officer Spencer Moore, a 14-year veteran of the department, and another man were detained, and police found three pill bottles containing over a hundred oxycodone pills in Moore's car. He is charged with possession with the intent to distribute a narcotic, possession of a controlled dangerous substance, and obtaining a prescription by fraud. He is being held without bail at the Baltimore County Department of Corrections.

In Baker, Louisiana, a now-former probation officer was convicted last Thursday of taking money to rig a city worker's drug test. Peron McCastle, 56, went down after he was recorded telling the worker the test had come back positive, but he had reported it as negative. He then demanded an unspecified sum of money from the worker. He was convicted of public bribery and is looking at up to five years in state prison.

In Pueblo, Colorado, a now-former state prison guard was sentenced last Wednesday to 60 days in jail for smuggling methamphetamine to a prisoner with whom she was romantically involved. Sarah James, 25, had pleaded guilty last month to a misdemeanor count of possession of contraband. She went down after she was caught coming to work with two packages of meth and a love letter to the inmate in her lunchbox. She admitted to being paid $2,000 on each of three occasions she had smuggled drugs into the jail.

In Charlotte, North Carolina, a former Transportation Security Administration (TSA) officer was sentenced Tuesday to 25 years in federal prison for participating in a cocaine trafficking conspiracy that introduced large quantities of the drug into North Carolina cities. Jamie Blunder, 50, was convicted of drug trafficking conspiracy and firearms charges. Blunder wasn't accused of trafficking drugs at his airport job, but he did use his TSA position to avoid police detection while traveling.

Categories: Corruption

This Week's Corrupt Cops Stories

Police Corruption (STDW) - Wed, 07/18/2018 - 20:35

A Tennessee sheriff's head narc is under investigation for stealing stuff at a drug bust, cops in Georgia and Vermont go to prison for stealing from the evidence locker, and more. Let's get to it:

[image:1 align:left]In Murfreesboro, Tennessee, a Rutherford County sheriff's lieutenant was placed under investigation Monday after being accused of stealing property seized during a drug bust. Lt. Jason Mathis, a 20-year veteran, is the head of the department's narcotics unit. He does not yet face any criminal charges, but an investigation is underway and he could be hit with a count of official misconduct. Dozens of criminal drug cases could be in jeopardy if he is charged.

In Bernice, Louisiana, a former Bernice police officer was arrested last Wednesday for unspecified misdeeds and allegedly threatening people who knew about them. Christopher Kevin Henry was fired after an investigation began in May and arrested by the narcotics unit after testing positive for methamphetamine last week.

In Burlington, Vermont, a former Royalton police officer was sentenced last Thursday to six months in prison after admitting stealing drugs from the department's evidence locker. John Breault confessed that he stole the drugs for a friend and for a woman with whom he had a relationship last year. He pleaded guilty in March to federal heroin distribution charges.

In Dalton, Georgia, a former Tunnel Hill police officer was sentenced last Thursday to five years in prison for stealing weapons and seized drug money from the police department. Scott Reneau had pleaded guilty to six counts each of theft and violation of office by a public official. Reneau went down after county officials ordered an audit into missing forfeiture money and weapons in 2016.

Categories: Corruption

Mexico's President-Elect Looks for Ways to End the Drug Wars [FEATURE]

Police Corruption (STDW) - Fri, 07/06/2018 - 18:28

Last Sunday, leftist politician Andres Manuel López Obrador -- often referred to with the acronymic AMLO -- won the Mexican presidency in a landslide. When he takes office in December, with his party in control of both houses of the Mexican Congress, Mexico's drug policies are likely to see some radical changes.

[image:1 align:left caption:true]Just what AMLO does will have significant consequences on both sides of the border. His policies will impact how much heroin and cocaine make it to the streets of America, as well as how many Mexicans flee north to escape prohibition-related violence, and how much drug money flows back into Mexico, corrupting politicians, police, and the military.

That AMLO -- and Mexico -- want change is no surprise. A vigorous campaign against the country's powerful and violent drug trafficking organizations -- the so-called cartels -- unleashed by rightist president Felipe Calderon in 2006 brought the Mexican military into the fight, but instead of defeating the cartels, the campaign, still ongoing under President Enrique Pena Nieto, has instead led to record levels of corruption and violence.

In 2012, when both the U.S. and Mexico had presidential elections and the drug war death toll was around 15,000, Mexico's drug prohibition-related violence was big news north of the border. But in the years since then, as US attention to Mexico's drug wars wavered, it's only gotten worse. Last year, Mexico saw more than 30,000 murders, and the cumulative drug war toll in the past dozen years is more than 200,000 dead and tens of thousands of "disappeared."

But the toll runs deeper than just a count of the casualties. The relentless drug war violence and the endemic corruption of police forces, politicians, and even sectors of the military by cartels have had a deeply corrosive effect on the citizenry and its belief in the ability of the country's political institutions to address the problem.

López Obrador, the former mayor of Mexico City, campaigned heavily on the need for change, especially around drug policy, corruption, and public safety. "Abrazos, no balazos" ("hugs, not gunfights") was one of his favorite campaign slogans. AMLO campaigned cautiously, hammering away at crime, corruption, and violence and mentioning different drug policy-related changes, but not coming out with specific policy proposals. Still, from his own remarks and those of people who will be assuming key positions in his administration, we can begin to sketch an outline of what those policies may look like.

Marijuana Legalization

Mexico is one of the world's largest marijuana producers (although the local industry has been taking a hit in recent years from completion north of the border), it has decriminalized the possession of small amounts of the herb, and it has legalized medical marijuana.

AMLO's pick for interior minister, former Supreme Court official Olga Sánchez Cordero has made no secret of her plans to seek full legalization and said this week that AMLO may seek a public referendum to gauge popular support for it. "Why maintain pot prohibition when Canada and US states are legalizing it, she said. "What are we thinking? Tell me. Killing ourselves. Really, keep on killing when... North America is decriminalizing?"

Drug Legalization

The possession of personal use amounts of all drugs has been decriminalized in Mexico since 2009, but that hasn't stopped the violence. AMLO and his advisors say he is open to considering taking the next step and legalizing all drugs.

"We'll analyze everything and explore all the avenues that will let us achieve peace. I don't rule out anything, not even legalization -- nothing," AMLO told the New Yorker during the campaign.

"The war on drugs has failed," wrote Sánchez Cordero. "Nothing contributes to peace by legislating on the basis of more criminal punishment and permanent confrontation. Violence is not fought with violence, as López Obrador rightly points out."

Drug legalization would be a radical step, indeed. It probably isn't going to happen under AMLO, since that would pit Mexico not only against the US, but also against the international anti-drug treaties that serve as the legal backbone of global drug prohibition. But he is putting the idea squarely on the table.

Amnesty

As a candidate, AMLO floated the idea of amnesty for those involved in the drug trade, a notion that created huge controversy and forced his campaign to clarify that it did not mean cutting deals with bloody-handed cartel leaders or their henchmen. Instead, his campaign clarified, he was referring to peasants growing drug crops and other low-level, nonviolent workers in the illicit business.

"Kidnappers? No," said Sánchez Cordero about possible amnesty recipients. "Who? The people working in rural areas, who are criminals because they work in the illegal drug business, but haven't committed crimes such as murder or kidnapping."

[image:2 align:right caption:true]Demilitarization and Policing Reforms

For the past 12 years, the Mexican military has been called on to fight the cartels and suppress the drug trade. But the level of violence has only increased, the military is implicated in massive human rights violations (as can only be expected when a government resorts to soldiers to do police work), and finds itself subject to the same corrupting influences that have turned state and local police forces into virtual arms of the competing cartels.

With regard to cartel violence, AMLO repeatedly said on the campaign trail that "you don't fight fire with fire" and that what was needed was not soldiers on the streets, but social and economic assistance for the country's poor and unemployed -- to give them options other than going to work for drug gangs. Just this week, AMLO announced a $5 billion package of scholarships and job training support for the young.

Still, AMLO isn't going to send the soldiers back to the barracks immediately. Instead, says one of his security advisors, his goal is to do it over the next three years. He has also proposed replacing the military presence in the drug war with a 300,000-person National Guard, composed of both military and police, a notion that has been bruited by earlier administrations as a means of effectively replacing tainted state and local police participation.

Here, AMLO is not nearly as radical as with some of his other drug policy proposals. He as much as concedes that the bloody drug wars will continue.

"I'm not overwhelmed by any of it," Eric L. Olson, an expert on Mexico and security at the Wilson Center in Washington, told the Washington Post. "It falls well within the norm for what other politicians have been saying."

The US-Mexico Relationship

Over the past couple of Mexican administrations, Mexican security agencies have cooperated closely with their U.S. counterparts in the DEA and FBI. It's not clear whether that level of cooperation will be sustained under AMLO. When he was running for president in 2012, he called for blocking US intelligence work in Mexico, but during this campaign, he insisted he wanted a strong relationship with the US on security and trade issues.

While Mexico may chafe under the continued threats and insults of President Trump, it benefits from security cooperation with the US and would like to see the US do more, especially about the flow of guns south across the border.

"We are going to ask for the cooperation of the United States" on gun trafficking, said Alfonso Durazo, one of AMLO's security advisers, repeating an ongoing refrain from Mexican politicians.

Mexico has also benefited from DEA intelligence that allowed it to kill or capture numerous cartel figures. But AMLO is a much pricklier personality than his predecessor, and between Trump's racist Mexico- and immigrant-bashing and his imposition of tariffs on Mexican exports, US-Mexico relations could be in for a bumpy few years. AMLO's moves on changing drug policies at home are also likely to sustain fire from the White House, further inflaming tensions.

"The bottom line is he's not going to fight the drug war in the way that it's been fought in the last few decades," David Shirk, a professor at the University of San Diego who is an expert on security issues in Mexico told the Post. "That is potentially a huge change."

This article was produced by Drug Reporter, a project of the Independent Media Institute.

Categories: Corruption

This Week's Corrupt Cops Stories

Police Corruption (STDW) - Fri, 07/06/2018 - 03:57

A Paterson, New Jersey, cop gets ready to pay for going buck wild, a New Mexico state trooper uses stolen drugs to woo women (and girls), a Florida deputy gets nailed for falsely busting people for drugs, and more. Let's get to it:

[image:1 align:right]In Bunker Hill, Indiana, a state prison guard was arrested last Friday after she got caught smuggling suboxone and methamphetamine into the Miami Correctional Facility. Officer Talleigha Titus went down after being tripped up by surveillance of inmate phone and payment records. She is charged with attempting to traffic, possession of methamphetamine and possession of a controlled substance.

In Farmington, New Mexico, a state trooper was arrested last Saturday for stealing drugs during arrests and giving them to women with whom he was romantically interested, including a 16-year-old girl. Officer Daniel Capehart went down after a meth user told investigators Capehart had been texting her for months and they set up a sting where he offered to split drugs with her from any bust she set up. In the case of the teen, Capehart sent numerous texts to set up deliveries of marijuana, but the teen had handed her phone over to the cops, and he was actually communicating with a San Juan County sheriff's detective. He is charged with distribution of methamphetamine and marijuana.

In Fernandina Beach, Florida, a Nassau County sheriff's deputy was arrested last Saturday for not testing drugs found in the field and making false claims that some drugs were illegal. Deputy Kyle Tholl, 38, is now a former deputy. Tholl repeatedly pulled people over for traffic violations and charged them with drug possession when the drugs were either prescribed over the counter medications. He is charged with perjury and filing a false police report. Some 30 of his drug cases have now been dropped.

In Paterson, New Jersey, a former Paterson police officer pleaded guilty last Wednesday to stealing drugs, dealing drugs from his squad car, and beating up a wheelchair-bound hospital patient. Ruben McAusland, 26, went down in April in a federal probe. He admitted in federal court to dealing heroin, cocaine, crack, and marijuana from his squad car while in uniform, as well as the unprovoked attack on the hospital patient, which he and his partner videotaped. He copped to drug possession with an intent to distribute and deprivation of civil rights under color of law. McAusland will be facing up to 50 years in prison when he gets sentenced on Oct. 9. The ex-cop must also forfeit $13,650 -- the amount of money he made on drug deals.

In Great Falls, Montana, a Fort Peck tribal police officer was sentenced last Thursday to a year and a day in prison for stealing drugs and money from the tribe's drug investigation office. Mikkel Shields, 33, had previously pleaded guilty to burglary in the case, which compromised more than two dozen drug cases. In September, he broke into the Fort Peck Tribal Law and Justice Building and used a crowbar to get into the drug investigations office, where he took opiates, methamphetamine and cash. He had been diagnosed with PTSD after serving in the military and had undergone substance abuse treatment, but relapsed in August.

Categories: Corruption

This Week's Corrupt Cops Stories

Police Corruption (STDW) - Wed, 06/27/2018 - 21:35

It's a special Northeast edition of corrupt cops this week, with bad apples being harvested from the Big Apple, Albany, and upstate, as well as New Jersey and Connecticut. Let's get to it:

[image:1 align:right]In New York City, an NYPD officer was arrested Monday for not turning in all the cash he seized from a drug suspect, returning the suspect's cell phone, accepting a $250 bottle of Johnnie Walker Blue Label scotch as a thank-you gift, and offering to fix the man's pending court case for $20,000. Officer Johnny Diaz, a 23-year veteran, also helped transport a kilo of cocaine from the Bronx to upper Manhattan in exchange for $4,000. He is initially charged with first-degree possession of a controlled substance, but more charges are pending, officials said.

In Geneseo, New York, a Livingston County correctional officer was arrested last Thursday for allegedly smuggling synthetic cannabinoids into the jail. Raul Santiago, 38, went down after an internal investigation and is now charged with bribery, promoting prison contraband, and official misconduct.

In Hamden, Connecticut, a state prison guard was sentenced last Wednesday to three years' probation for using and peddling steroids. Police serving a search warrant found 25,000 steroid pills and 530 steroid vials. Nicholas Aurora, 34, was using the drugs and selling them to some of his co-workers, authorities said. He pleaded guilty to possession with intent to distribute anabolic steroids.

In Albany, New York, a former state prison guard was sentenced last Thursday to a year and a day in federal prison for coordinating the delivery of 120 pounds of marijuana back in 2011. Brad Rushford, 35, Rushford admitted to providing a driver and scout cell phones to be used in delivering the marijuana. He went down after the shipment got busted en route.

In Toms Rivers, New Jersey, a former Ocean County sheriff's deputy was sentenced last Friday to three years in prison for stealing cocaine that was intended to be used training drug dogs. John C. Adams, 41, admitted using the cocaine himself and falsely reporting that it had been accidentally thrown away with other dog training supplies. He pleaded guilty in November to official misconduct and theft. Adams must serve two years before his eligible for parole.

Categories: Corruption
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