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US MA: Finally, Some Can Buy Medical Marijuana in Massachusetts

Top Stories (MAP) - Sun, 06/28/2015 - 07:00
Boston Globe, 28 Jun 2015 - Almost 32 months after Massachusetts voters approved a new law to legalize medical marijuana, pot was sold legally last week to patients in Salem from the first dispensary to open in the state. Supporters of the law cheered the opening, saying it was a long time coming.
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US IL: Debate Swirls Around Bill to Decriminalize Marijuana in

Top Stories (MAP) - Sun, 06/28/2015 - 07:00
The Journal Standard, 28 Jun 2015 - DEBATE SWIRLS AROUND BILL TO DECRIMINALIZE MARIJUANA IN ILLINOIS If Mike Bonds had avoided misdemeanor convictions for possession of small amounts of marijuana more than 15 years ago, he believes he might have been able to enlist in the U.S. Navy.
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US CA: Editorial: Pot Cases Prove Measure A Was Necessary

Top Stories (MAP) - Sun, 06/28/2015 - 07:00
Chico Enterprise-Record, 28 Jun 2015 - Butte County voters got it right during the November 2014 election. That's the obvious conclusion after the first number crunching occurred related to Measure A. The review showed that 512 cases came to light in the first six months of the new ordinance. By Butte County's count, about 40 to 50 new cases come in weekly, and the county is expecting that rate to increase as the year goes on.
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CN ON: Criminal Lawyer Suing Peel Police

Top Stories (MAP) - Sat, 06/27/2015 - 07:00
The Record, 27 Jun 2015 - Laura Liscio Alleges Police Engaged in Malicious Prosecution TORONTO - A Toronto lawyer once accused of smuggling drugs into a courthouse and arrested in front of colleagues and clients is suing police for malicious prosecution, her lawyer said Friday.
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US NM: Sf Drug Program Gets National Exposure

Top Stories (MAP) - Sat, 06/27/2015 - 07:00
Albuquerque Journal, 27 Jun 2015 - Law Officials to Talk at White House Gathering SANTA FE - Law enforcement officials here will have the opportunity to teach agencies from around the country about a new program combating opiate use at a White House conference next week.
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US CA: Pot Raids Uncover 'Egregious' Environmental Damage in

Top Stories (MAP) - Sat, 06/27/2015 - 07:00
The Press Democrat, 27 Jun 2015 - More than 86,500 marijuana plants were seized this week during a four-day eradication operation in the heart of Northern California's Emerald Triangle, where law enforcement officials from three counties also reported finding "egregious" environmental violations. The plants, along with cash, firearms and thousands of pounds of dried pot, were confiscated from the remote Island Mountain region where Mendocino, Humboldt and Trinity counties meet. Some 30 to 40 people - mostly law enforcement officers from the three counties' sheriff's departments, assisted by Fish and Wildlife and a handful of National Guard officers - participated in the assault on what they say were obviously illegal growing operations, most of which included more than 1,000 plants each.
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US NM: OPED: NM Should Watch Colorado's Trouble With Legalized

Top Stories (MAP) - Sat, 06/27/2015 - 07:00
Albuquerque Journal, 27 Jun 2015 - State's Experiment Brought Increased Crime, Car Wrecks and Homelessness I'd like the opportunity to reply to and rebut Rep. Bill McCamley's proposition to legalize marijuana here in New Mexico. The lessons learned from legalizing alcohol should be a stellar role model as to why this is a bad idea.
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Chronicle AM: PA MedMJ Bill Moves, OR Early Pot Sales Possible, Global Anti-Drug Day Protests, More (6/26/15)

Drug War Chronicle - Fri, 06/26/2015 - 23:51

Oregon legislators are working to move up legal pot sales, Pennsylvania's long-stalled medical marijuana bill moves under pressure, the state will also move to address asset forfeiture reform, and Global Anti-Drug day sparks death sentences in China, protests around the world. 

[image:1 align:left caption:true]Marijuana Policy

Key Oregon Committee Approves Early Marijuana Sales. Marijuana becomes legal in Oregon next week, but the state Liquor Control Commission says it will take until the second half of 2016 for it to be ready to allow pot shops to open. The legislature thinks that's too long, and Thursday, members of the House-Senate marijuana committee voted to approve a measure that would allow sales to begin October 1. Buyers would be limited to a quarter-ounce of buds per day, and they could also buy seeds and clones, but edibles or concentrates wouldn't be allowed. The measure must still pass the legislature and be signed into law to go into effect.

Rhode Island Legislative Session Ends, But Legalization Bill Still Alive. The session recessed Thursday, but a marijuana legalization bill, Senate Bill 510, remains alive because lawmakers have signaled they may call a special session to deal with pending bills

Medical Marijuana

Pennsylvania House Health Committee Unanimously Approves Medical Marijuana Bill. The House Health Committee voted unanimously today to approve Senate Bill 3, which would allow seriously ill Pennsylvanians to access medical marijuana with recommendations from their doctors. The bill will now go to the House Rules Committee for further consideration. The bill had been bottled up by the committee chair, but a vote was allowed after Rep. Nick Miccarelli (R-Ridley Park) filed a discharge petition that would have put it before the House for a floor vote. The bill passed the Senate in May.

Asset Forfeiture

Pennsylvania Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Push Coming. A bipartisan group of lawmakers joined a coalition of conservatives and civil libertarians this week to push for a legislative overhaul of the state's civil asset forfeiture laws. The coalition is known as Fix Forfeiture. "Asset forfeiture can be a critical tool for law enforcement to combat criminal activity," said Holly Harris, Fix Forfeiture’s senior project director. "But it’s also a tool that can be abused, entangling innocent property owners with the costly and often bizarre task of having to prove their property ‘innocent’ of criminal activity. Fix Forfeiture will work with a bipartisan group of lawmakers to pass the reform legislation introduced by Sen. Folmer and Rep. Cox to ensure the property and due process rights of innocent citizens are protected." That legislation is Senate Bill 869.

International

On the UN's Global Anti-Drug Day, Civil Society Fights Back. The UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) today released its 2015 World Drug Report as the organization marked the International Day Against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking, but civil society groups around the world used the occasion to take to the streets to demand an end to the global drug prohibition regime. Click on the link for much more.

Vancouver's Cannabis Day Will Go On Despite City's Wishes. Marc and Jodi Emery, the long-time organizers of Vancouver's July 1 Cannabis Day celebrations, say the event will go despite a cease and desist letter from the city. The event needs to be permitted, the city says. "People say get a permit that is not something we’ve done for 21 years, you can’t issue a permit for people to sell pot and smoke marijuana all day, there is no permit that allows that," Emery rejoined.

China Sentences 13 Drug Offenders to Death in Public Rally. A crowd of 10,000 in Lufeng in the southern province of Guangdong watched as Chinese officials sentenced 13 drug traffickers to death and 8 more to suspended death sentences. The sentences came on the UN's International Anti-Drug Day amid a Chinese campaign to rally support for crime crackdowns. 

Categories: Latest News

On the UN's Global Anti-Drug Day, Civil Society Fights Back [FEATURE]

Drug War Chronicle - Fri, 06/26/2015 - 21:57

The UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) today released its 2015 World Drug Report as the organization marked the International Day Against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking, but civil society groups around the world used the occasion to take to the streets to demand an end to the global drug prohibition regime.

[image:1 align:left]The report itself was relatively anodyne by UNODC standards, noting that illicit drug was "stable," with around 250 million people having used illegal drugs in the previous year. There was "little change in the overall global situation regarding the production, use and health consequences of illicit drugs," the UNODC noted.

The annual report did make note of deleterious consequences related to drug prohibition -- including high overdose death rates and health consequences, as well strengthening terrorist and organized crime networks -- but failed to acknowledge the role of prohibition in creating and aggravating the very problems it claims to address.

Global civil society took it upon itself to rectify that omission. Led by the International Drug Policy Consortium, dozens of groups mobilizing thousands of people marched or otherwise took action in at least 150 cities worldwide as part of the Support, Don't Punish global advocacy campaign. Support has more than tripled since 2013, when 41 cities participated.

"On the 26th June, thousands of people in over 150 cities will take part in a global day of action for the Support. Don’t Punish campaign. The campaign is a global show of force to say enough is enough – it’s time to end the wasteful and damaging war on drugs," said Ann Fordham, Executive Director of the International Drug Policy Consortium (IDPC).

"Governments need to wake up," declared Idrissa Ba, Executive Director of the Association Sénégalaise pour la Réduction des Risques Infectieux chez les Groupes Vulnerables (ASRDR) and member of the West African Commission on Drugs. "In the last year we’ve spent another $100 billion on fighting the drug war, and yet again we’ve seen no change, but the human cost in terms of lives lost, new HIV infections or the forced detention of people who use drugs is immeasurable. Doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result, isn’t that the definition of madness?” 

[image:2 align:right]In New York City, people from groups including the Drug Policy Alliance, Students for Sensible Drug Policy, the Harm Reduction Coalition, National Advocates for Pregnant Women, Espolea, México Unido Contra la Delincuencia, and Transform met an UN headquarters to demand reforms in the broken global drug prohibition system.

In Washington, DC, another march went from the State Department to the White House to demand that the Obama administration take stronger steps to bring about an end to global drug prohibition and the human rights abuses committed in its name, including the resort to the death penalty for drug offenses.  

"The purpose of 'Support, Don't Punish' is not only to spread global awareness about the failures of prohibition, but to demand that world leaders place human rights at the forefront of any conversation around global drug trafficking," said Jake Agliata, regional outreach coordinator for Students for Sensible Drug Policy, an organization with chapters on hundreds of campuses worldwide and which coordinated the DC march. "Executing people for nonviolent drug offenses is not acceptable, and the State Department should take steps to ensure that our tax dollars never contribute to this archaic practice."

"The World Drug Report has dutifully laid out what some of the key harms of the current system are. But the report fails to note that the system itself is a cause of those harms, not a solution for them," said David Borden, executive director of StoptheDrugWar.org, cosponsor of the DC march. "Prohibiting drugs sends both use and the trade in drugs into a criminal underground, generating untold profits for drug lords and causing terrible harms to many users. We were at the State Department today because we think the US should get behind efforts to reform the UN drug conventions. It doesn't make sense to maintain a treaty structure that is based on prohibition while the U.S. and other countries are taking steps toward legalization."

[image:3 align:left caption:true]The day of action is intended to help frame the debate in advance of a UN General Assembly Special Session on Drug scheduled for next April, where countries have the opportunity to revise international treaties that threaten to stand in the way of reforms such as marijuana legalization and harm reduction measures like syringe exchange.

Last month, a coalition of more than 100 organizations, including the American Civil Liberties Union and Human Rights Watch, released a sign-on letter calling on nations to begin the process of revising the drug control treaties. The letter is online here

A full list of events from Friday's global day of action is available here. Actions were set to to take place in Australia, Brazil, Egypt, India, Mexico, Nigeria, Russia, Thailand, Ukraine, the United Kingdom, and the USA – as well as in Argentina, Belgium, Benin, Bolivia, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Canada, Colombia, Costa Rica, Denmark, France, The Gambia, Georgia, Ghana, Greece, Hungary, Indonesia, Ireland, Ivory Coast, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Lebanon, Liberia, Lithuania, Macedonia, Malawi, Malaysia, Mali, Moldova, Montenegro, Myanmar, Nepal, New Zealand, Niger, Norway, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Puerto Rico, Romania, Serbia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Slovakia, Spain, Switzerland, Tajikistan, Tunisia, Uruguay, Uzbekistan and Zimbabwe.

Categories: Latest News

On the UN's Global Anti-Drug Day, Civil Society Fights Back [FEATURE]

Top Stories (STDW) - Fri, 06/26/2015 - 21:57

The UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) today released its 2015 World Drug Report as the organization marked the International Day Against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking, but civil society groups around the world used the occasion to take to the streets to demand an end to the global drug prohibition regime.

[image:1 align:left]The report itself was relatively anodyne by UNODC standards, noting that illicit drug was "stable," with around 250 million people having used illegal drugs in the previous year. There was "little change in the overall global situation regarding the production, use and health consequences of illicit drugs," the UNODC noted.

The annual report did make note of deleterious consequences related to drug prohibition -- including high overdose death rates and health consequences, as well strengthening terrorist and organized crime networks -- but failed to acknowledge the role of prohibition in creating and aggravating the very problems it claims to address.

Global civil society took it upon itself to rectify that omission. Led by the International Drug Policy Consortium, dozens of groups mobilizing thousands of people marched or otherwise took action in at least 150 cities worldwide as part of the Support, Don't Punish global advocacy campaign. Support has more than tripled since 2013, when 41 cities participated.

"On the 26th June, thousands of people in over 150 cities will take part in a global day of action for the Support. Don’t Punish campaign. The campaign is a global show of force to say enough is enough – it’s time to end the wasteful and damaging war on drugs," said Ann Fordham, Executive Director of the International Drug Policy Consortium (IDPC).

"Governments need to wake up," declared Idrissa Ba, Executive Director of the Association Sénégalaise pour la Réduction des Risques Infectieux chez les Groupes Vulnerables (ASRDR) and member of the West African Commission on Drugs. "In the last year we’ve spent another $100 billion on fighting the drug war, and yet again we’ve seen no change, but the human cost in terms of lives lost, new HIV infections or the forced detention of people who use drugs is immeasurable. Doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result, isn’t that the definition of madness?” 

[image:2 align:right]In New York City, people from groups including the Drug Policy Alliance, Students for Sensible Drug Policy, the Harm Reduction Coalition, National Advocates for Pregnant Women, Espolea, México Unido Contra la Delincuencia, and Transform met an UN headquarters to demand reforms in the broken global drug prohibition system.

In Washington, DC, another march went from the State Department to the White House to demand that the Obama administration take stronger steps to bring about an end to global drug prohibition and the human rights abuses committed in its name, including the resort to the death penalty for drug offenses.  

"The purpose of 'Support, Don't Punish' is not only to spread global awareness about the failures of prohibition, but to demand that world leaders place human rights at the forefront of any conversation around global drug trafficking," said Jake Agliata, regional outreach coordinator for Students for Sensible Drug Policy, an organization with chapters on hundreds of campuses worldwide and which coordinated the DC march. "Executing people for nonviolent drug offenses is not acceptable, and the State Department should take steps to ensure that our tax dollars never contribute to this archaic practice."

"The World Drug Report has dutifully laid out what some of the key harms of the current system are. But the report fails to note that the system itself is a cause of those harms, not a solution for them," said David Borden, executive director of StoptheDrugWar.org, cosponsor of the DC march. "Prohibiting drugs sends both use and the trade in drugs into a criminal underground, generating untold profits for drug lords and causing terrible harms to many users. We were at the State Department today because we think the US should get behind efforts to reform the UN drug conventions. It doesn't make sense to maintain a treaty structure that is based on prohibition while the U.S. and other countries are taking steps toward legalization."

[image:3 align:left caption:true]The day of action is intended to help frame the debate in advance of a UN General Assembly Special Session on Drug scheduled for next April, where countries have the opportunity to revise international treaties that threaten to stand in the way of reforms such as marijuana legalization and harm reduction measures like syringe exchange.

Last month, a coalition of more than 100 organizations, including the American Civil Liberties Union and Human Rights Watch, released a sign-on letter calling on nations to begin the process of revising the drug control treaties. The letter is online here

A full list of events from Friday's global day of action is available here. Actions were set to to take place in Australia, Brazil, Egypt, India, Mexico, Nigeria, Russia, Thailand, Ukraine, the United Kingdom, and the USA – as well as in Argentina, Belgium, Benin, Bolivia, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Canada, Colombia, Costa Rica, Denmark, France, The Gambia, Georgia, Ghana, Greece, Hungary, Indonesia, Ireland, Ivory Coast, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Lebanon, Liberia, Lithuania, Macedonia, Malawi, Malaysia, Mali, Moldova, Montenegro, Myanmar, Nepal, New Zealand, Niger, Norway, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Puerto Rico, Romania, Serbia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Slovakia, Spain, Switzerland, Tajikistan, Tunisia, Uruguay, Uzbekistan and Zimbabwe.

Categories: Latest News

It's Full Speed Ahead for CA Marijuana Legalization Next Year [FEATURE]

Drug War Chronicle - Fri, 06/26/2015 - 18:44

This article was written in collaboration with AlterNet and first appeared here.

On June 14, more than 200 people gathered at the Sebastopol Grange for a fundraiser and organizing meeting of local pot growers, the Sonoma County Growers Association. They were being mentored by their northern neighbors from Humboldt, Mendocino, and Trinity counties, the Emerald Growers Association, which already has lobbyists in Sacramento and is in the middle of the effort to legalize weed in California next year. The Emerald Triangle is the largest marijuana growing area in the country's largest marijuana producing state.

[image:1 align:right]Two days later, more than a hundred people met in a conference room at the Oakland Marriot City Center to plot the intricacies of producing a statewide marijuana legalization initiative. For several hours, attendees -- dispensary operators and employees, small growers, not-so-small growers, patients, consumers, interested citizens, even a nun -- offered their input on a rapid-fire but seemingly endless array of issues related to legalization and how it should occur:

Who can grow it? How much? Where? Who can grow it commercially? Should there be tiered licensing to ensure small operators have a chance? Who can sell it? Can cities and counties opt out? Who should regulate it? How should it be taxed and how much? Where should the revenues go? Should there be amnesties or expungements of records? Should employees be protected from being fired for smoking on their own time? Should there be protections from child welfare services or family courts? Does impaired driving need to be addressed? What about medical marijuana? Should existing businesses get a priority?

The complexities of knitting together a legalization initiative that will satisfy the community's already well-developed interest groups become apparent. But the process is nearing its end, and, it is hoped, a repeat of the movement infighting that accompanied 2010's failed Prop 19 effort can be avoided.

The Bay area events are nothing unusual in California this year. Pot politics is in the air. There is a lot at stake for the existing medical marijuana system as the legislature tries again to agree on a statewide regulation scheme, but beyond that, there's the whole issue of outright legalization, and that's going to come to a head in the months leading up to November 2016.

That's because Californians are extremely likely to have a chance to vote directly to approve legalization then and quite likely to do so. Polls this year are coming in with support for legalization above 50%, although not enough above for anyone to think it's going to be a slam dunk. Four legalization initiatives are already at the state attorney general's office awaiting circulating titles and summaries, while a fifth, and the one most likely to actually qualify for the ballot, is set to drop sometime this summer.

Four states and the District of Columbia have already beaten California in the race to Promised Land of legal weed (much to the chagrin of California activists), but if and when the state goes green, that could be the death knell for pot prohibition. In one fell swoop, 15% of the entire country will have legalized it--and that's not even counting other states also likely to legalize it the same day, including Maine, Massachusetts, and Nevada. When the nation's most populous state does something, the rest of us take notice.

[image:2 align:left caption:true]Enforcing marijuana prohibition constitutes about half of all the resources--state, local, and federal--devoted to the war on drugs. When a state as large as California rejects pot prohibition, that begins to call into question the entire drug war model, and the resources devoted to it. Legalizing in California will have ramification far beyond the state's borders.

The initiative everyone is waiting on is from the California Coalition for Cannabis Policy Reform, the group that organized the Oakland meeting -- and 13 others just like it among stakeholders in every corner of the state. The coalition, also known by its web address, ReformCA, is working with a number of state and national organizations to get a broadly-backed legalization initiative on the ballot.

ReformCA's state supporters include California NORML, the California Cannabis Industry Association, the Emerald Growers Association, the Greater Los Angeles Collective Alliance, Oaksterdam University, and the state chapter of the NAACP. Its national allies include such deep-pocketed groups as the Drug Policy Alliance (DPA) and the Marijuana Policy Project, as well as Americans for Safe Access, Students for Sensible Drug Policy, Law Enforcement Against Prohibition, and the United Food & Commercial Workers.

"We're definitely working in coalition with a lot of organizations, including criminal justice and public health organizations," said Amanda Reiman, DPA's manager for marijuana law and policy. "They agree that legalization is the right step; that we need to regulate it. There seems to be a fair amount of unity there."

The ReformCA public forums were a deliberate way to "hear from the marijuana base," said Reiman. "They have ideas, and those come back to the coalition, but that is only a small piece of the puzzle. We've also been meeting with people who don’t come at it from a consumer or industry perspective -- medical, law enforcement, public health. They have an interest in this, too; we all have a vested interest in a sound regulatory structure."

North Bay cannabis defense attorney Omar Figueroa has a hand in a couple of other initiatives that have already been filed, the California Craft Cannabis Initiative and the Marijuana Control, Legalization, and Revenue Act of 2016. Based in Sonoma County, just south of the Emerald Triangle, he's attuned to the interests of small growers, and both initiatives reflect that.

Both have provisions for marijuana cultivation licensing schemes that would leave room for the area's traditionally family-sized operations, designated "craft growers" in one and "artisan cultivators" in the other. Small-scale operations would be able to buy cultivation license for far less than operations large enough to be designated "commercial."

Whether the initiative campaigns end up folding themselves into the ReformCA campaign remains to be seen.

"The craft cannabis initiative is there for discussion purposes; I'm releasing the meme into the wild," said Figueroa. "But the other one actually has some funding behind it. It'll probably end up unifying with what ReformCA comes up with -- if it's palatable."

Figueroa has his druthers and he has his bottom line.

"I'd prefer that medical marijuana be untaxed or less taxed, and I'd prefer that regulation be done by a transparent elected body like a cannabis commission," he said. "And it would be nice if existing growers got priority licensing or some sort of head start, but at a minimum would be recognizing appellations. California has world famous cannabis appellations. No one's ever heard of Denver or Boulder bud; it doesn't have that branding that Humboldt or Mendocino does.

But in the end, he's looking for an initiative that is "create no new crimes and legalizes personal cultivation."

ReformCA and the other initiative proponents aren't even the only game in town when it comes to marijuana policy reform. Their efforts are going on parallel to the work of the Blue Ribbon Commission on Cannabis Policy, led by pro-legalization Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) and the ACLU of Northern California, which will issue a much-anticipated report on July 7.

While not explicitly pro-legalization itself, the commission was formed out of the expectation that legalization is coming and in an effort to and is identifying policy issues and solutions related to dealing with it. Its membership consists of policymakers, public health experts, and academics, and its report will include input from important groups not necessarily friendly to change, such as the California Police Chiefs Association.

Waiting for the commission report is one of two things slowing the completion of the ReformCA initiative, sound Dale Gieringer, longtime head of California NORML, as well as a spokesman for the coalition.

[image:3 align:right]"The biggest one is whether the legislature will implement a comprehensive medical marijuana regulation system this year or not, and what it would look like," he said. "But it looks like they will pass Assembly Bill 266, which is basically a multi-agency approach. I think we now have a good idea of where the legislature is headed and a solution to the problem of regulation."

The other thing is the Blue Ribbon Commission report.

"I suspect we'll see a draft shortly thereafter, but I can't guarantee that. It may take another four to six weeks of working out," Gieringer said. "Several drafts have been circulated, and we're waiting for something from the Drug Policy Alliance, with the advice of a bunch of other people who've been consulted. But nothing has been finalized."

The clock is ticking, but the only real hard deadline facing initiatives is, ironically enough, April 20. That's when signatures have to be in if they want to make the 2016 ballot.

Still, the sooner the better. Initiatives need 585,000 valid voter signatures to qualify for the ballot, which means they better have a minimum of 800,000 or even more to account for the inevitable disqualified signatures. It also means initiatives don't manage to get on the ballot without a paid signature-gathering campaign, and the less time they have, the more they have to pay. Budget $1 or $2 million just to get those signatures.

"We could file as late as November or December," said Gieringer. "It just costs more. If we were ready now or even next month, that would give us maximum time to do everything, but it looks like it's going to be a rush."

Funding will appear, supporters said, but they are going to need a lot. The 2010 Prop 19 initiative campaign raised and spent $5 million for advertising and get-out-the-vote efforts, and that wasn't enough. California is a huge and expensive series of media markets, and organizers are thinkng they will need to spend somewhere between $10 and $20 million to ensure victory.

The traditional deep pocketed sources of drug reform funding -- the Drug Policy Alliance and its PACs, the Marijuana Policy Project and its PACs, the Peter Lewis estate -- have not yet committed serious money, but they are watching with great interest.

DPA's Reiman would say little about funding, except that "the money is out there, and we're just going to have to see. Right now, we're doing our due diligence."

"I'm confident we can get the money, there are large pledges sitting on the sidelines ready to get in once signature collection starts," Gieringer said. "And there are some promising leads, although the industry itself has been very disappointing. They're quick to suggest things to make it more profitable, but not so quick to put up the money."

One exception is Weedmaps, the dispensary-locater app. The Orange Count company announced in April that it had donated $1 million to a campaign committee called Californians for Sensible Reform, which will support what it thinks is the strongest legalization measure on the ballot. Weedmaps is also throwing another million bucks into a PAC of the same name that will spend it supporting weed-friendly candidates.

California is a large, complicated state. Even its marijuana movement is large and complicated, not to mention factoring in the interests of the much, much larger non-marijuana community. Whether all the moving parts can fit together in a measure that can win at the ballot box next year is an unanswered question, but Reiman sounds confident.

"Coming up with the details is where the difficulty is, and there's always something to disagree about, but we're coming at this with such strong support, we've got the Blue Ribbon Commission, that's more academic and political weight behind this than ever before," she said. C

Categories: Latest News

It's Full Speed Ahead for CA Marijuana Legalization Next Year [FEATURE]

Top Stories (STDW) - Fri, 06/26/2015 - 18:44

This article was written in collaboration with AlterNet and first appeared here.

On June 14, more than 200 people gathered at the Sebastopol Grange for a fundraiser and organizing meeting of local pot growers, the Sonoma County Growers Association. They were being mentored by their northern neighbors from Humboldt, Mendocino, and Trinity counties, the Emerald Growers Association, which already has lobbyists in Sacramento and is in the middle of the effort to legalize weed in California next year. The Emerald Triangle is the largest marijuana growing area in the country's largest marijuana producing state.

[image:1 align:right]Two days later, more than a hundred people met in a conference room at the Oakland Marriot City Center to plot the intricacies of producing a statewide marijuana legalization initiative. For several hours, attendees -- dispensary operators and employees, small growers, not-so-small growers, patients, consumers, interested citizens, even a nun -- offered their input on a rapid-fire but seemingly endless array of issues related to legalization and how it should occur:

Who can grow it? How much? Where? Who can grow it commercially? Should there be tiered licensing to ensure small operators have a chance? Who can sell it? Can cities and counties opt out? Who should regulate it? How should it be taxed and how much? Where should the revenues go? Should there be amnesties or expungements of records? Should employees be protected from being fired for smoking on their own time? Should there be protections from child welfare services or family courts? Does impaired driving need to be addressed? What about medical marijuana? Should existing businesses get a priority?

The complexities of knitting together a legalization initiative that will satisfy the community's already well-developed interest groups become apparent. But the process is nearing its end, and, it is hoped, a repeat of the movement infighting that accompanied 2010's failed Prop 19 effort can be avoided.

The Bay area events are nothing unusual in California this year. Pot politics is in the air. There is a lot at stake for the existing medical marijuana system as the legislature tries again to agree on a statewide regulation scheme, but beyond that, there's the whole issue of outright legalization, and that's going to come to a head in the months leading up to November 2016.

That's because Californians are extremely likely to have a chance to vote directly to approve legalization then and quite likely to do so. Polls this year are coming in with support for legalization above 50%, although not enough above for anyone to think it's going to be a slam dunk. Four legalization initiatives are already at the state attorney general's office awaiting circulating titles and summaries, while a fifth, and the one most likely to actually qualify for the ballot, is set to drop sometime this summer.

Four states and the District of Columbia have already beaten California in the race to Promised Land of legal weed (much to the chagrin of California activists), but if and when the state goes green, that could be the death knell for pot prohibition. In one fell swoop, 15% of the entire country will have legalized it--and that's not even counting other states also likely to legalize it the same day, including Maine, Massachusetts, and Nevada. When the nation's most populous state does something, the rest of us take notice.

[image:2 align:left caption:true]Enforcing marijuana prohibition constitutes about half of all the resources--state, local, and federal--devoted to the war on drugs. When a state as large as California rejects pot prohibition, that begins to call into question the entire drug war model, and the resources devoted to it. Legalizing in California will have ramification far beyond the state's borders.

The initiative everyone is waiting on is from the California Coalition for Cannabis Policy Reform, the group that organized the Oakland meeting -- and 13 others just like it among stakeholders in every corner of the state. The coalition, also known by its web address, ReformCA, is working with a number of state and national organizations to get a broadly-backed legalization initiative on the ballot.

ReformCA's state supporters include California NORML, the California Cannabis Industry Association, the Emerald Growers Association, the Greater Los Angeles Collective Alliance, Oaksterdam University, and the state chapter of the NAACP. Its national allies include such deep-pocketed groups as the Drug Policy Alliance (DPA) and the Marijuana Policy Project, as well as Americans for Safe Access, Students for Sensible Drug Policy, Law Enforcement Against Prohibition, and the United Food & Commercial Workers.

"We're definitely working in coalition with a lot of organizations, including criminal justice and public health organizations," said Amanda Reiman, DPA's manager for marijuana law and policy. "They agree that legalization is the right step; that we need to regulate it. There seems to be a fair amount of unity there."

The ReformCA public forums were a deliberate way to "hear from the marijuana base," said Reiman. "They have ideas, and those come back to the coalition, but that is only a small piece of the puzzle. We've also been meeting with people who don’t come at it from a consumer or industry perspective -- medical, law enforcement, public health. They have an interest in this, too; we all have a vested interest in a sound regulatory structure."

North Bay cannabis defense attorney Omar Figueroa has a hand in a couple of other initiatives that have already been filed, the California Craft Cannabis Initiative and the Marijuana Control, Legalization, and Revenue Act of 2016. Based in Sonoma County, just south of the Emerald Triangle, he's attuned to the interests of small growers, and both initiatives reflect that.

Both have provisions for marijuana cultivation licensing schemes that would leave room for the area's traditionally family-sized operations, designated "craft growers" in one and "artisan cultivators" in the other. Small-scale operations would be able to buy cultivation license for far less than operations large enough to be designated "commercial."

Whether the initiative campaigns end up folding themselves into the ReformCA campaign remains to be seen.

"The craft cannabis initiative is there for discussion purposes; I'm releasing the meme into the wild," said Figueroa. "But the other one actually has some funding behind it. It'll probably end up unifying with what ReformCA comes up with -- if it's palatable."

Figueroa has his druthers and he has his bottom line.

"I'd prefer that medical marijuana be untaxed or less taxed, and I'd prefer that regulation be done by a transparent elected body like a cannabis commission," he said. "And it would be nice if existing growers got priority licensing or some sort of head start, but at a minimum would be recognizing appellations. California has world famous cannabis appellations. No one's ever heard of Denver or Boulder bud; it doesn't have that branding that Humboldt or Mendocino does.

But in the end, he's looking for an initiative that is "create no new crimes and legalizes personal cultivation."

ReformCA and the other initiative proponents aren't even the only game in town when it comes to marijuana policy reform. Their efforts are going on parallel to the work of the Blue Ribbon Commission on Cannabis Policy, led by pro-legalization Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) and the ACLU of Northern California, which will issue a much-anticipated report on July 7.

While not explicitly pro-legalization itself, the commission was formed out of the expectation that legalization is coming and in an effort to and is identifying policy issues and solutions related to dealing with it. Its membership consists of policymakers, public health experts, and academics, and its report will include input from important groups not necessarily friendly to change, such as the California Police Chiefs Association.

Waiting for the commission report is one of two things slowing the completion of the ReformCA initiative, sound Dale Gieringer, longtime head of California NORML, as well as a spokesman for the coalition.

[image:3 align:right]"The biggest one is whether the legislature will implement a comprehensive medical marijuana regulation system this year or not, and what it would look like," he said. "But it looks like they will pass Assembly Bill 266, which is basically a multi-agency approach. I think we now have a good idea of where the legislature is headed and a solution to the problem of regulation."

The other thing is the Blue Ribbon Commission report.

"I suspect we'll see a draft shortly thereafter, but I can't guarantee that. It may take another four to six weeks of working out," Gieringer said. "Several drafts have been circulated, and we're waiting for something from the Drug Policy Alliance, with the advice of a bunch of other people who've been consulted. But nothing has been finalized."

The clock is ticking, but the only real hard deadline facing initiatives is, ironically enough, April 20. That's when signatures have to be in if they want to make the 2016 ballot.

Still, the sooner the better. Initiatives need 585,000 valid voter signatures to qualify for the ballot, which means they better have a minimum of 800,000 or even more to account for the inevitable disqualified signatures. It also means initiatives don't manage to get on the ballot without a paid signature-gathering campaign, and the less time they have, the more they have to pay. Budget $1 or $2 million just to get those signatures.

"We could file as late as November or December," said Gieringer. "It just costs more. If we were ready now or even next month, that would give us maximum time to do everything, but it looks like it's going to be a rush."

Funding will appear, supporters said, but they are going to need a lot. The 2010 Prop 19 initiative campaign raised and spent $5 million for advertising and get-out-the-vote efforts, and that wasn't enough. California is a huge and expensive series of media markets, and organizers are thinkng they will need to spend somewhere between $10 and $20 million to ensure victory.

The traditional deep pocketed sources of drug reform funding -- the Drug Policy Alliance and its PACs, the Marijuana Policy Project and its PACs, the Peter Lewis estate -- have not yet committed serious money, but they are watching with great interest.

DPA's Reiman would say little about funding, except that "the money is out there, and we're just going to have to see. Right now, we're doing our due diligence."

"I'm confident we can get the money, there are large pledges sitting on the sidelines ready to get in once signature collection starts," Gieringer said. "And there are some promising leads, although the industry itself has been very disappointing. They're quick to suggest things to make it more profitable, but not so quick to put up the money."

One exception is Weedmaps, the dispensary-locater app. The Orange Count company announced in April that it had donated $1 million to a campaign committee called Californians for Sensible Reform, which will support what it thinks is the strongest legalization measure on the ballot. Weedmaps is also throwing another million bucks into a PAC of the same name that will spend it supporting weed-friendly candidates.

California is a large, complicated state. Even its marijuana movement is large and complicated, not to mention factoring in the interests of the much, much larger non-marijuana community. Whether all the moving parts can fit together in a measure that can win at the ballot box next year is an unanswered question, but Reiman sounds confident.

"Coming up with the details is where the difficulty is, and there's always something to disagree about, but we're coming at this with such strong support, we've got the Blue Ribbon Commission, that's more academic and political weight behind this than ever before," she said. C

Categories: Latest News

CN BC: B.C. Is Canada's Drug Offence Capital

Top Stories (MAP) - Fri, 06/26/2015 - 07:00
Vancouver 24hours, 26 Jun 2015 - B.C. has undoubtedly the highest drug offence rates reported by police across the country and its reputation has remained steadfast over three decades, according to data compiled by Statistics Canada. The statistics agency says that apart from 2012, British Columbia has had the highest reported drug offence rate among all provinces from the early '80s to 2013.
Categories: Latest News

CN YK: Methadone Returning To Whitehorse's Jail

Top Stories (MAP) - Fri, 06/26/2015 - 07:00
Yukon News, 26 Jun 2015 - Methadone is once again going to be offered at the Whitehorse Correctional Centre. Three years after inmates started being forced off the drug, justice officials say they are now equipped to start offering it again.
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CN BC: Column: Pot Shop Regulations And What They Mean

Top Stories (MAP) - Fri, 06/26/2015 - 07:00
Vancouver Courier, 26 Jun 2015 - Now that council decided to regulate illegal marijuana dispensaries, you probably have some questions. So I thought I'd select a few I've heard from people and do my best to answer them. Here we go...
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CN BC: Victoria Looks To Vancouver For Dispensary Guidelines

Top Stories (MAP) - Fri, 06/26/2015 - 07:00
Globe and Mail, 26 Jun 2015 - Victoria's mayor says her city will look to emulate Vancouver's plan to regulate marijuana dispensaries despite warnings from the Conservative federal government that they are illegal and threaten public health. Councillors in Vancouver approved a plan this week to create a new class of business licence for dispensaries, impose hefty licensing fees and keep them away from other operators, schools and community centres. Processing of the licences is expected to start in the coming months.
Categories: Latest News

Chronicle AM: Vancouver Regulates Dispensaries, Albanian Pot Clashes, OR Pot Bill Advances, More (6/25/15)

Drug War Chronicle - Thu, 06/25/2015 - 21:16

You can listen in on the marijuana conversation in California, there's more Ohio pot legalization news, the Oregon House has passed a marijuana regulation bill, Vancouver decides to regulate its dispensaries, and more.

[image:1 align:left caption:true]Marijuana Policy

Drug Policy Alliance Releases Videos of Three Marijuana Symposia in California. In an effort to educate the public and discuss pressing issues related to the legalization of marijuana in California in 2016, the Drug Policy Alliance held three symposia, each focusing on a different aspect of marijuana regulation. Videos from those symposia are now available online to view for free. The first symposia, held in Los Angeles, addressed issues related to marijuana use and public health. The second symposia, held in Oakland, addressed the social and racial justice issues related to legalization, including the modification of criminal penalties for marijuana, and the impact that prohibition has had and legalization might have on communities typically targeted by the War on Drugs. The final symposia, held in Eureka, focused on the impact that marijuana prohibition has had on the environment, and the ways in which this damage can be addressed via the regulation of marijuana cultivation. Click on the link to see the videos.

Ohio House Approves Measure Aimed at Blocking Legalization Initiative. The House voted 81-12 Wednesday to put a question before voters this November that could derail the ResponsibleOhio legalization initiative that will likely appear on the same ballot. It now goes to the Senate. The lawmakers are pushing a constitutional amendment that would block attempts to use the state constitution to create monopolies, as was the case with a casino initiative a few years ago and is the case with the ResponsibleOhio initiative, which would limit commercial grows to 10 investors who have already paid into the campaign.

Another Ohio Legalization Initiative Approved for Signature-Gathering. A legalization initiative sponsored by Ohioans to End Prohibition has been certified by the Ohio Ballot Board and can now begin signature gathering. Petitioners will now have to gather 306,000 vote signatures to appear on the ballot, most likely next year.

Oregon House Passes Marijuana Regulation Bill. The House Wednesday sweepingly approved House Bill 3400, a 127-page bill put together by members of joint legislative marijuana committee. It would impose new limits on medical marijuana growers, make it easier for the state's conservative eastern counties to opt out of legal sales, and reduce penalties for many of the state's remaining marijuana offenses. The bill now heads to the Senate. Marijuana becomes legal in Oregon as of next week, but sales are unlikely to start until next year.

Medical Marijuana

Massachusett's First Dispensary is Open for Business. The Alternative Therapies Group has opened the state's first dispensary in Salem. It only took three years once voters approved medical marijuana in 2012.

International

Vancouver Approves Regulation of Medical Marijuana Dispensaries. Ignoring the angry protests of the federal government, Vancouver city councilors voted Wednesday to regulate and license the estimated 100 dispensaries operating in the city. Dispensaries will have to pay a $30,000 license fee, and some will have to move or close because the regulations also bar them from operating within a thousand feet of schools, community centers, or other dispensaries.

Albanian Marijuana Growers in Armed Clashes With Police. At least one police officer has been killed and two wounded in fighting between police and pot growers in the town of Lazarat, known as the "cannabis kingdom" for its industrial-scale marijuana production. More than 400 police, supported by army helicopters, have surrounded the town, where they say at least 21 members of an armed group are holed up. The same thing happened last year, when police clashed with armed groups for a week before managing to take control of the town. Italian police estimate the town produces 900 tons of pot annually. 

Categories: Latest News

YOU Are Needed in Tomorrow's Global Day of Action for Drug Reform!

Drug War Chronicle - Thu, 06/25/2015 - 15:20

[image:1 align:left]Tomorrow, Friday, June 26, join with organizations around the world in the annual "Support. Don't Punish" Global Day of Action. If you are in Washington, DC please demonstrate with us at the US State Department and the White House Friday morning!

Support Don't Punish is an international advocacy campaign intended to raise awareness of the harms being caused by the war on drugs. The campaign aims to promote drug policies that respect human rights and protect public health, to change laws and policies that impede access to harm reduction interventions and other evidence-based services, and to end the criminalization of people who use drugs. Visit www.supportdontpunish.org for further information about the campaign. June 26 is also the United Nations' International Day Against Drug Abuse and Trafficking, and Support Don't Punish is the reform movement's global response.

Whether you live near an event location or not, or have to time to get to one, there are important ways that you can contribute to the Day of Action: [image:2 align:right caption:true]

  1. Promote Support. Don't Punish. on social media. A social media guide for the Day of Action is online here. It includes actions you can take both today and tomorrow.
  2. Participate in the interactive Photo Project. This could be as simple as printing out the Support. Don't Punish. sign and taking a picture with it and sending in, or you can get a group together or do something creative. Click on the link to view examples, and please send us copies of your photos too.
  3. Attend an event -- especially ours here in Washington! There's another demonstration outside the UN in New York, and there's a full global list of all announced events published here.
  4. Sign up today for the Support. Don't Punish. "Thunderclap" -- a web site that you can authorize to post a Support. Don't Punish. message to your Facebook and Twitter accounts. All participants' messages will be posted by Thunderclap at the same time tomorrow, to make a splash and get people's attention.

Click here for the latest update from the Support. Don't Punish. campaign, and visit www.supportdontpunish.org for further information.

Categories: Latest News

CN ON: Vancouver Regulates Medical Pot Stores

Top Stories (MAP) - Thu, 06/25/2015 - 07:00
The Record, 25 Jun 2015 - First City in Canada: Decried by Feds but Mayor Is OK With It Vancouver has become the first city in Canada to regulate illegal marijuana dispensaries, a move that has "deeply disappointed" the federal government but was declared a common-sense approach by the mayor.
Categories: Latest News

CN BC: Vancouver Becomes First To Regulate Pot Dispensaries

Top Stories (MAP) - Thu, 06/25/2015 - 07:00
Globe and Mail, 25 Jun 2015 - The City of Vancouver has approved a two-tier licensing system to curb the explosion of illegal medical marijuana dispensaries, defying warnings from the federal government by becoming the first jurisdiction in Canada to regulate storefront pot sales. Councillors voted on Wednesday to introduce a new business licensing system for compassion clubs and dispensaries, whose numbers have ballooned to about 100 across the city, up from a handful just several years ago. The vote followed extensive public hearings, in which most speakers generally supported regulation, and stern letters from federal cabinet ministers urging council to abandon its plan. The provincial Health Minister and the head of the local health authority have voiced their support for the rules, and Victoria's mayor says her staff are already studying Vancouver's new bylaw and will report back to council in September about imposing similar regulations on the 19 dispensaries in that city.
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