News aggregator

US FL: Florida's Young Medical Marijuana Industry Takes Off

Cannabis - Medicinal (MAP) - Sat, 04/28/2018 - 07:00
Orlando Sentinel, 28 Apr 2018 - Florida's 16-month-old medical marijuana business is growing fast, as dispensaries and growers rush to establish themselves. It's happening even as court battles over state regulations for the young industry rage on. Florida's 16-month-old medical marijuana business is growing fast, as dispensaries and growers rush to establish themselves. It's happening even as court battles over state regulations for the young industry rage on.
Categories: Medical Marijuana

US HI: Bill Allows Tourists To Buy Medical Marijuana

Cannabis - Medicinal (MAP) - Sat, 04/28/2018 - 07:00
Honolulu Star-Advertiser, 28 Apr 2018 - Out-of-state marijuana patients visiting Hawaii soon may be allowed to buy their medicinal pot at local dispensaries, a potential boon to the fledgling cannabis industry. A bill allowing so-called reciprocity has gained enough support to become law, passing out of a key legislative committee Friday and positioned for a full legislative vote. If the bill passes the Legislature, it would go to the governor for final approval.
Categories: Medical Marijuana

US: Hemp, Not Food, Pushing Senate To Consider Sweeping Farm Bill

Marijuana (MAP) - Fri, 04/27/2018 - 07:00
Lexington Herald-Leader, 27 Apr 2018 - WASHINGTON - The massive farm bill that helps determine what farmers grow and Americans eat is poised to get some major momentum thanks to a not-yet-legal crop: Hemp. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, who has pushed hard to make hemp a legal product in the United States, is asking for his hemp legalization bill to be included in the sweeping farm bill. That would help give the farm bill, whose prospects have been considered iffy, more support in the Senate.
Categories: Marijuana

US: Hemp, Not Food, Pushing Senate To Consider Sweeping Farm Bill

Top Stories (MAP) - Fri, 04/27/2018 - 07:00
Lexington Herald-Leader, 27 Apr 2018 - WASHINGTON - The massive farm bill that helps determine what farmers grow and Americans eat is poised to get some major momentum thanks to a not-yet-legal crop: Hemp. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, who has pushed hard to make hemp a legal product in the United States, is asking for his hemp legalization bill to be included in the sweeping farm bill. That would help give the farm bill, whose prospects have been considered iffy, more support in the Senate.
Categories: Latest News

US CA: Pot To Treat Autism? UC San Diego Scientists To Conduct Study

Marijuana (MAP) - Thu, 04/26/2018 - 07:00
The State, 26 Apr 2018 - It's already used to treat epilepsy in some children -- and now researchers are examining whether a marijuana compound could also be helpful for those with autism. The University of California San Diego announced in a news release that it will be conducting a test on children with "severe" autism to see if cannabidiol, commonly referred to as CBD, can help treat some of their symptoms.
Categories: Marijuana

US NY: CNN's Gupta Urges Sessions To Back Medical Marijuana

Marijuana (MAP) - Thu, 04/26/2018 - 07:00
Daily Herald, 26 Apr 2018 - NEW YORK -- CNN's medical correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta has taken the unusual step of publicly urging Attorney General Jeff Sessions to reconsider his opposition to medical marijuana, particularly as a way to fight the opioid epidemic. Gupta wrote a public letter to Sessions, saying that he had changed his mind on the use of medical marijuana, and he's certain Sessions can, too. Research and talking to people who say marijuana has eased pain and weaned them off opioids convinced him.
Categories: Marijuana

US CA: Pot To Treat Autism? UC San Diego Scientists To Conduct Study

Cannabis - Medicinal (MAP) - Thu, 04/26/2018 - 07:00
The State, 26 Apr 2018 - It's already used to treat epilepsy in some children -- and now researchers are examining whether a marijuana compound could also be helpful for those with autism. The University of California San Diego announced in a news release that it will be conducting a test on children with "severe" autism to see if cannabidiol, commonly referred to as CBD, can help treat some of their symptoms.
Categories: Medical Marijuana

US NY: CNN's Gupta Urges Sessions To Back Medical Marijuana

Cannabis - Medicinal (MAP) - Thu, 04/26/2018 - 07:00
Daily Herald, 26 Apr 2018 - NEW YORK -- CNN's medical correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta has taken the unusual step of publicly urging Attorney General Jeff Sessions to reconsider his opposition to medical marijuana, particularly as a way to fight the opioid epidemic. Gupta wrote a public letter to Sessions, saying that he had changed his mind on the use of medical marijuana, and he's certain Sessions can, too. Research and talking to people who say marijuana has eased pain and weaned them off opioids convinced him.
Categories: Medical Marijuana

US CA: Pot To Treat Autism? UC San Diego Scientists To Conduct Study

Top Stories (MAP) - Thu, 04/26/2018 - 07:00
The State, 26 Apr 2018 - It's already used to treat epilepsy in some children -- and now researchers are examining whether a marijuana compound could also be helpful for those with autism. The University of California San Diego announced in a news release that it will be conducting a test on children with "severe" autism to see if cannabidiol, commonly referred to as CBD, can help treat some of their symptoms.
Categories: Latest News

US NY: CNN's Gupta Urges Sessions To Back Medical Marijuana

Top Stories (MAP) - Thu, 04/26/2018 - 07:00
Daily Herald, 26 Apr 2018 - NEW YORK -- CNN's medical correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta has taken the unusual step of publicly urging Attorney General Jeff Sessions to reconsider his opposition to medical marijuana, particularly as a way to fight the opioid epidemic. Gupta wrote a public letter to Sessions, saying that he had changed his mind on the use of medical marijuana, and he's certain Sessions can, too. Research and talking to people who say marijuana has eased pain and weaned them off opioids convinced him.
Categories: Latest News

This Week's Corrupt Cops Stories

Drug War Chronicle - Wed, 04/25/2018 - 17:32

This week brings a full hand of cops arrested on various drug charges, including a South Carolina police chief with a pill habit and a New Jersey cop with a drug-dealing habit. Let's get to it:

[image:1 align:right]In Dothan, Alabama, a Dothan police officer was arrested last Tuesday for allegedly possessing stolen drugs. Sergeant Jonathan Whaley went down after he began behaving erratically during a training class, was then drug tested, and placed on paid leave. Police then searched his vehicle and found Xanax and codeine that are believed to have been stolen from a home where Whaley answered a medical call. He is charged with two counts of illegally possessing controlled substances and two counts of theft.

In Walhalla, South Carolina, the former Walhalla police chief was arrested last Friday, just days after he was forced to resign, for allegedly illegally obtaining prescription drugs from officers, their families, and private citizens over a seven-year period. A three-count indictment says he cadged spare pain pills that had been obtained legitimately by officers under his command. He faces three counts of misconduct in office. He's looking at up to three years in prison.

In Paterson, New Jersey, a Paterson police officer was arrested last Friday on charges he dealt heroin and cocaine to a wired-up informant. Officer Ruben McAusland, 26, is accused of repeatedly selling heroin, crack, and powder cocaine to local drug dealers. He faces unspecified drug distribution charges and is now out on $100,000 bail.

In Waxhaw, North Carolina, a Gaston County assistant district attorney was arrested Sunday after he was caught in possession of heroin and methamphetamine. Assistant DA James Brandon Graham was carrying 11 syringes, six of which contained heroin and three of which tested positive for meth. Two were empty. He charged with felony counts of heroin and methamphetamine possession and a misdemeanor count of possessing drug paraphernalia. His workload included drug cases. There is no word yet on how those cases may be effected.

In Newport News, Virginia, a Poquoson police officer was arrested Monday for allegedly taking a bribe from a drug dealing suspect "in exchange for impeding prosecution." Officer Dearyl Anderson, 56, faces a single count of bribery. He is now on administrative leave.

Categories: Latest News

This Week's Corrupt Cops Stories

Police Corruption (STDW) - Wed, 04/25/2018 - 17:32

This week brings a full hand of cops arrested on various drug charges, including a South Carolina police chief with a pill habit and a New Jersey cop with a drug-dealing habit. Let's get to it:

[image:1 align:right]In Dothan, Alabama, a Dothan police officer was arrested last Tuesday for allegedly possessing stolen drugs. Sergeant Jonathan Whaley went down after he began behaving erratically during a training class, was then drug tested, and placed on paid leave. Police then searched his vehicle and found Xanax and codeine that are believed to have been stolen from a home where Whaley answered a medical call. He is charged with two counts of illegally possessing controlled substances and two counts of theft.

In Walhalla, South Carolina, the former Walhalla police chief was arrested last Friday, just days after he was forced to resign, for allegedly illegally obtaining prescription drugs from officers, their families, and private citizens over a seven-year period. A three-count indictment says he cadged spare pain pills that had been obtained legitimately by officers under his command. He faces three counts of misconduct in office. He's looking at up to three years in prison.

In Paterson, New Jersey, a Paterson police officer was arrested last Friday on charges he dealt heroin and cocaine to a wired-up informant. Officer Ruben McAusland, 26, is accused of repeatedly selling heroin, crack, and powder cocaine to local drug dealers. He faces unspecified drug distribution charges and is now out on $100,000 bail.

In Waxhaw, North Carolina, a Gaston County assistant district attorney was arrested Sunday after he was caught in possession of heroin and methamphetamine. Assistant DA James Brandon Graham was carrying 11 syringes, six of which contained heroin and three of which tested positive for meth. Two were empty. He charged with felony counts of heroin and methamphetamine possession and a misdemeanor count of possessing drug paraphernalia. His workload included drug cases. There is no word yet on how those cases may be effected.

In Newport News, Virginia, a Poquoson police officer was arrested Monday for allegedly taking a bribe from a drug dealing suspect "in exchange for impeding prosecution." Officer Dearyl Anderson, 56, faces a single count of bribery. He is now on administrative leave.

Categories: Corruption

Marijuana's Midwest Breakthrough: Michigan to Vote on Legalization in November [FEATURE]

Drug War Chronicle - Wed, 04/25/2018 - 16:55

This article was produced in collaboration with AlterNet and first appeared here.

The Midwest could soon see its first state end marijuana prohibition. State officials in Michigan announced Tuesday that a marijuana legalization initiative has enough valid voter signatures to appear on the November ballot. Polls in the state suggest it will win.

[image:1 align:left]That would be a major breakthrough for legal marijuana. So far, legalization has been limited to West Coast, Rocky Mountain, and New England states, but a victory in Michigan this fall would free the weed in a major Midwest state. Legal marijuana would no longer be limited to the country's fringes, but would have a home in the heartland, and that would lay the groundwork for a more rapid erosion of pot prohibition at the state level.

There's a chance some other state could beat Michigan to the punch -- there are legislative efforts still alive in several states -- but legalizing weed at the statehouse has proven to be a frustrating, years-long task. With a ballot initiative, voters accomplish as much (if not more and better) in one fell swoop.

It's not absolutely official yet -- the state Board of Canvassers is set to formally certify the count on Thursday -- but the Board of Elections announced Monday that it counted 277,370 valid voter signatures, nearly 10% more than the 252,523 required to be approved for the ballot.

The initiative, the Michigan Regulation and Taxation of Marijuana Act, would:

  • Legalize the possession and sale of up to 2.5 ounces of marijuana for personal, recreational use and up to 10 ounces at home.
  • Legalize the cultivation of up to 12 plants, as well as the fruits of the harvest.
  • Tax marijuana sales at a rate of a 10% excise tax at the retail level as well as a 6% sales tax. The estimated revenues from the taxes are at least $100 million.
  • Split those revenues with 35% going to K-12 education, 35% to roads, 15% to the communities that allow marijuana businesses in their communities and 15% to counties where marijuana business are located.
  • Allow communities to decide whether they'll permit marijuana businesses.
  • Restrict purchases of marijuana for recreational purposes to 2.5 ounces, but an individual could keep up to 10 ounces of marijuana in their homes.
  • Allow the Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs (LARA), and not the politically appointed licensing board that will regulate the medical marijuana side of the issue, to regulate and license marijuana businesses, ranging from growers, transporters, testers and dispensaries.
  • Set up three classes of marijuana growers: up to 100, 500 and 2,000 plants.

The initiative was put together by the Coalition to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol, a combined effort of veteran state activists and the ACLU of Michigan and national drug reform groups, including the Marijuana Policy Project and the Drug Policy Alliance. It was built on the back of a 2016 initiative campaign that came up just short on signatures.

The initiative looks well-positioned to win in November, riding as it does pot's ever-increasing wave of popularity. A February poll had support for legalization in Michigan at 57%, while a March poll came in at 61%. Those are the kinds of polling numbers initiative and referendum experts like to see at the beginning of the campaign because they suggest that even with the inevitable erosion of support in the face of opposition attacks, the measure still has a big enough cushion to pull off a victory.

Support for legalization has also seeped into the state Democratic Party, with all four Democratic gubernatorial candidates now behind it. Ditto for the state attorney general race, with both Democrats now embracing legalization.

No mainstream Republicans have embraced the initiative, but there have been reports that state GOP politicians are now considering passing a legalization bill in the legislature in a bid to blunt voter turnout in what they fear could be a Blue Wave election. They worry that the chance to vote for marijuana could produce an electorate more likely to throw them out of office.

They may well be right. The day after election day, Michigan could wake up to both legal marijuana and a Democratic majority in the state house and/or senate. Wouldn't that be something?

Categories: Latest News

Marijuana's Midwest Breakthrough: Michigan to Vote on Legalization in November [FEATURE]

Marijuana (STDW) - Wed, 04/25/2018 - 16:55

This article was produced in collaboration with AlterNet and first appeared here.

The Midwest could soon see its first state end marijuana prohibition. State officials in Michigan announced Tuesday that a marijuana legalization initiative has enough valid voter signatures to appear on the November ballot. Polls in the state suggest it will win.

[image:1 align:left]That would be a major breakthrough for legal marijuana. So far, legalization has been limited to West Coast, Rocky Mountain, and New England states, but a victory in Michigan this fall would free the weed in a major Midwest state. Legal marijuana would no longer be limited to the country's fringes, but would have a home in the heartland, and that would lay the groundwork for a more rapid erosion of pot prohibition at the state level.

There's a chance some other state could beat Michigan to the punch -- there are legislative efforts still alive in several states -- but legalizing weed at the statehouse has proven to be a frustrating, years-long task. With a ballot initiative, voters accomplish as much (if not more and better) in one fell swoop.

It's not absolutely official yet -- the state Board of Canvassers is set to formally certify the count on Thursday -- but the Board of Elections announced Monday that it counted 277,370 valid voter signatures, nearly 10% more than the 252,523 required to be approved for the ballot.

The initiative, the Michigan Regulation and Taxation of Marijuana Act, would:

  • Legalize the possession and sale of up to 2.5 ounces of marijuana for personal, recreational use and up to 10 ounces at home.
  • Legalize the cultivation of up to 12 plants, as well as the fruits of the harvest.
  • Tax marijuana sales at a rate of a 10% excise tax at the retail level as well as a 6% sales tax. The estimated revenues from the taxes are at least $100 million.
  • Split those revenues with 35% going to K-12 education, 35% to roads, 15% to the communities that allow marijuana businesses in their communities and 15% to counties where marijuana business are located.
  • Allow communities to decide whether they'll permit marijuana businesses.
  • Restrict purchases of marijuana for recreational purposes to 2.5 ounces, but an individual could keep up to 10 ounces of marijuana in their homes.
  • Allow the Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs (LARA), and not the politically appointed licensing board that will regulate the medical marijuana side of the issue, to regulate and license marijuana businesses, ranging from growers, transporters, testers and dispensaries.
  • Set up three classes of marijuana growers: up to 100, 500 and 2,000 plants.

The initiative was put together by the Coalition to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol, a combined effort of veteran state activists and the ACLU of Michigan and national drug reform groups, including the Marijuana Policy Project and the Drug Policy Alliance. It was built on the back of a 2016 initiative campaign that came up just short on signatures.

The initiative looks well-positioned to win in November, riding as it does pot's ever-increasing wave of popularity. A February poll had support for legalization in Michigan at 57%, while a March poll came in at 61%. Those are the kinds of polling numbers initiative and referendum experts like to see at the beginning of the campaign because they suggest that even with the inevitable erosion of support in the face of opposition attacks, the measure still has a big enough cushion to pull off a victory.

Support for legalization has also seeped into the state Democratic Party, with all four Democratic gubernatorial candidates now behind it. Ditto for the state attorney general race, with both Democrats now embracing legalization.

No mainstream Republicans have embraced the initiative, but there have been reports that state GOP politicians are now considering passing a legalization bill in the legislature in a bid to blunt voter turnout in what they fear could be a Blue Wave election. They worry that the chance to vote for marijuana could produce an electorate more likely to throw them out of office.

They may well be right. The day after election day, Michigan could wake up to both legal marijuana and a Democratic majority in the state house and/or senate. Wouldn't that be something?

Categories: Marijuana

Marijuana's Midwest Breakthrough: Michigan to Vote on Legalization in November [FEATURE]

Ballot Measures (STDW) - Wed, 04/25/2018 - 16:55

This article was produced in collaboration with AlterNet and first appeared here.

The Midwest could soon see its first state end marijuana prohibition. State officials in Michigan announced Tuesday that a marijuana legalization initiative has enough valid voter signatures to appear on the November ballot. Polls in the state suggest it will win.

[image:1 align:left]That would be a major breakthrough for legal marijuana. So far, legalization has been limited to West Coast, Rocky Mountain, and New England states, but a victory in Michigan this fall would free the weed in a major Midwest state. Legal marijuana would no longer be limited to the country's fringes, but would have a home in the heartland, and that would lay the groundwork for a more rapid erosion of pot prohibition at the state level.

There's a chance some other state could beat Michigan to the punch -- there are legislative efforts still alive in several states -- but legalizing weed at the statehouse has proven to be a frustrating, years-long task. With a ballot initiative, voters accomplish as much (if not more and better) in one fell swoop.

It's not absolutely official yet -- the state Board of Canvassers is set to formally certify the count on Thursday -- but the Board of Elections announced Monday that it counted 277,370 valid voter signatures, nearly 10% more than the 252,523 required to be approved for the ballot.

The initiative, the Michigan Regulation and Taxation of Marijuana Act, would:

  • Legalize the possession and sale of up to 2.5 ounces of marijuana for personal, recreational use and up to 10 ounces at home.
  • Legalize the cultivation of up to 12 plants, as well as the fruits of the harvest.
  • Tax marijuana sales at a rate of a 10% excise tax at the retail level as well as a 6% sales tax. The estimated revenues from the taxes are at least $100 million.
  • Split those revenues with 35% going to K-12 education, 35% to roads, 15% to the communities that allow marijuana businesses in their communities and 15% to counties where marijuana business are located.
  • Allow communities to decide whether they'll permit marijuana businesses.
  • Restrict purchases of marijuana for recreational purposes to 2.5 ounces, but an individual could keep up to 10 ounces of marijuana in their homes.
  • Allow the Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs (LARA), and not the politically appointed licensing board that will regulate the medical marijuana side of the issue, to regulate and license marijuana businesses, ranging from growers, transporters, testers and dispensaries.
  • Set up three classes of marijuana growers: up to 100, 500 and 2,000 plants.

The initiative was put together by the Coalition to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol, a combined effort of veteran state activists and the ACLU of Michigan and national drug reform groups, including the Marijuana Policy Project and the Drug Policy Alliance. It was built on the back of a 2016 initiative campaign that came up just short on signatures.

The initiative looks well-positioned to win in November, riding as it does pot's ever-increasing wave of popularity. A February poll had support for legalization in Michigan at 57%, while a March poll came in at 61%. Those are the kinds of polling numbers initiative and referendum experts like to see at the beginning of the campaign because they suggest that even with the inevitable erosion of support in the face of opposition attacks, the measure still has a big enough cushion to pull off a victory.

Support for legalization has also seeped into the state Democratic Party, with all four Democratic gubernatorial candidates now behind it. Ditto for the state attorney general race, with both Democrats now embracing legalization.

No mainstream Republicans have embraced the initiative, but there have been reports that state GOP politicians are now considering passing a legalization bill in the legislature in a bid to blunt voter turnout in what they fear could be a Blue Wave election. They worry that the chance to vote for marijuana could produce an electorate more likely to throw them out of office.

They may well be right. The day after election day, Michigan could wake up to both legal marijuana and a Democratic majority in the state house and/or senate. Wouldn't that be something?

Categories: Ballot Initiatives

Marijuana's Midwest Breakthrough: Michigan to Vote on Legalization in November [FEATURE]

Top Stories (STDW) - Wed, 04/25/2018 - 16:55

This article was produced in collaboration with AlterNet and first appeared here.

The Midwest could soon see its first state end marijuana prohibition. State officials in Michigan announced Tuesday that a marijuana legalization initiative has enough valid voter signatures to appear on the November ballot. Polls in the state suggest it will win.

[image:1 align:left]That would be a major breakthrough for legal marijuana. So far, legalization has been limited to West Coast, Rocky Mountain, and New England states, but a victory in Michigan this fall would free the weed in a major Midwest state. Legal marijuana would no longer be limited to the country's fringes, but would have a home in the heartland, and that would lay the groundwork for a more rapid erosion of pot prohibition at the state level.

There's a chance some other state could beat Michigan to the punch -- there are legislative efforts still alive in several states -- but legalizing weed at the statehouse has proven to be a frustrating, years-long task. With a ballot initiative, voters accomplish as much (if not more and better) in one fell swoop.

It's not absolutely official yet -- the state Board of Canvassers is set to formally certify the count on Thursday -- but the Board of Elections announced Monday that it counted 277,370 valid voter signatures, nearly 10% more than the 252,523 required to be approved for the ballot.

The initiative, the Michigan Regulation and Taxation of Marijuana Act, would:

  • Legalize the possession and sale of up to 2.5 ounces of marijuana for personal, recreational use and up to 10 ounces at home.
  • Legalize the cultivation of up to 12 plants, as well as the fruits of the harvest.
  • Tax marijuana sales at a rate of a 10% excise tax at the retail level as well as a 6% sales tax. The estimated revenues from the taxes are at least $100 million.
  • Split those revenues with 35% going to K-12 education, 35% to roads, 15% to the communities that allow marijuana businesses in their communities and 15% to counties where marijuana business are located.
  • Allow communities to decide whether they'll permit marijuana businesses.
  • Restrict purchases of marijuana for recreational purposes to 2.5 ounces, but an individual could keep up to 10 ounces of marijuana in their homes.
  • Allow the Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs (LARA), and not the politically appointed licensing board that will regulate the medical marijuana side of the issue, to regulate and license marijuana businesses, ranging from growers, transporters, testers and dispensaries.
  • Set up three classes of marijuana growers: up to 100, 500 and 2,000 plants.

The initiative was put together by the Coalition to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol, a combined effort of veteran state activists and the ACLU of Michigan and national drug reform groups, including the Marijuana Policy Project and the Drug Policy Alliance. It was built on the back of a 2016 initiative campaign that came up just short on signatures.

The initiative looks well-positioned to win in November, riding as it does pot's ever-increasing wave of popularity. A February poll had support for legalization in Michigan at 57%, while a March poll came in at 61%. Those are the kinds of polling numbers initiative and referendum experts like to see at the beginning of the campaign because they suggest that even with the inevitable erosion of support in the face of opposition attacks, the measure still has a big enough cushion to pull off a victory.

Support for legalization has also seeped into the state Democratic Party, with all four Democratic gubernatorial candidates now behind it. Ditto for the state attorney general race, with both Democrats now embracing legalization.

No mainstream Republicans have embraced the initiative, but there have been reports that state GOP politicians are now considering passing a legalization bill in the legislature in a bid to blunt voter turnout in what they fear could be a Blue Wave election. They worry that the chance to vote for marijuana could produce an electorate more likely to throw them out of office.

They may well be right. The day after election day, Michigan could wake up to both legal marijuana and a Democratic majority in the state house and/or senate. Wouldn't that be something?

Categories: Latest News

Medical Marijuana Update

Drug War Chronicle - Wed, 04/25/2018 - 16:51

It looks like Utahns will get a chance to vote for medical marijuana in November, medical marijuana bills advance in Missouri and South Carolina, and more.

[image:1 align:left]Illinois

Last Wednesday, the Houes approved medical marijuana for students at school. The House voted to approve House Bill 4870, which would allow parents to administer infused marijuana to their children in elementary and secondary schools. The bill passed by a margin of 99-1. It now goes to the Senate.

Missouri

On Tuesday, Mthe House gave initial approval to a medical marijuana bill. The House gave initial approval to House Bill 1554, which would allow people over 18 dying of terminal diseases or suffering from Alzheimer's, PTSD, and other enumerated conditions to use smokeless marijuana. The bill faces one more House vote before going to the Senate.

South Carolina

Last Thursday, a medical marijuana bill advanced. The House Medical, Military, Public and Municipal Affairs Committee voted 14-3 to approve House Bill 3521, the South Carolina Compassionate Care Act. The bill would allow seriously ill patients to use marijuana to treat their conditions with a recommendation from their doctors. The legislature's crossover deadline has already passed, but this vote, combined with approval by the Senate Medical Affairs Committee on March 29, builds momentum for full passage next year.

Utah

As of last Friday, a medical marijuana initiiative appeared set to qualify for the November ballot. A medical marijuana initiative from the Utah Patients Coalition looks very likely to qualify for the November ballot. While it won't be official until May 15, petitioners appear to have met the overall signature requirement, with 145,000 registered voter signatures in hand, well above the 113,000 required. But the initiative also must meet specific signature thresholds in each of the state's 29 state Senate districts. As of last Friday, they had done so in 26 of them.

[For extensive information about the medical marijuana debate, presented in a neutral format, visit MedicalMarijuana.ProCon.org.]

Categories: Latest News

Medical Marijuana Update

Marijuana (STDW) - Wed, 04/25/2018 - 16:51

It looks like Utahns will get a chance to vote for medical marijuana in November, medical marijuana bills advance in Missouri and South Carolina, and more.

[image:1 align:left]Illinois

Last Wednesday, the Houes approved medical marijuana for students at school. The House voted to approve House Bill 4870, which would allow parents to administer infused marijuana to their children in elementary and secondary schools. The bill passed by a margin of 99-1. It now goes to the Senate.

Missouri

On Tuesday, Mthe House gave initial approval to a medical marijuana bill. The House gave initial approval to House Bill 1554, which would allow people over 18 dying of terminal diseases or suffering from Alzheimer's, PTSD, and other enumerated conditions to use smokeless marijuana. The bill faces one more House vote before going to the Senate.

South Carolina

Last Thursday, a medical marijuana bill advanced. The House Medical, Military, Public and Municipal Affairs Committee voted 14-3 to approve House Bill 3521, the South Carolina Compassionate Care Act. The bill would allow seriously ill patients to use marijuana to treat their conditions with a recommendation from their doctors. The legislature's crossover deadline has already passed, but this vote, combined with approval by the Senate Medical Affairs Committee on March 29, builds momentum for full passage next year.

Utah

As of last Friday, a medical marijuana initiiative appeared set to qualify for the November ballot. A medical marijuana initiative from the Utah Patients Coalition looks very likely to qualify for the November ballot. While it won't be official until May 15, petitioners appear to have met the overall signature requirement, with 145,000 registered voter signatures in hand, well above the 113,000 required. But the initiative also must meet specific signature thresholds in each of the state's 29 state Senate districts. As of last Friday, they had done so in 26 of them.

[For extensive information about the medical marijuana debate, presented in a neutral format, visit MedicalMarijuana.ProCon.org.]

Categories: Marijuana

Medical Marijuana Update

Ballot Measures (STDW) - Wed, 04/25/2018 - 16:51

It looks like Utahns will get a chance to vote for medical marijuana in November, medical marijuana bills advance in Missouri and South Carolina, and more.

[image:1 align:left]Illinois

Last Wednesday, the Houes approved medical marijuana for students at school. The House voted to approve House Bill 4870, which would allow parents to administer infused marijuana to their children in elementary and secondary schools. The bill passed by a margin of 99-1. It now goes to the Senate.

Missouri

On Tuesday, Mthe House gave initial approval to a medical marijuana bill. The House gave initial approval to House Bill 1554, which would allow people over 18 dying of terminal diseases or suffering from Alzheimer's, PTSD, and other enumerated conditions to use smokeless marijuana. The bill faces one more House vote before going to the Senate.

South Carolina

Last Thursday, a medical marijuana bill advanced. The House Medical, Military, Public and Municipal Affairs Committee voted 14-3 to approve House Bill 3521, the South Carolina Compassionate Care Act. The bill would allow seriously ill patients to use marijuana to treat their conditions with a recommendation from their doctors. The legislature's crossover deadline has already passed, but this vote, combined with approval by the Senate Medical Affairs Committee on March 29, builds momentum for full passage next year.

Utah

As of last Friday, a medical marijuana initiiative appeared set to qualify for the November ballot. A medical marijuana initiative from the Utah Patients Coalition looks very likely to qualify for the November ballot. While it won't be official until May 15, petitioners appear to have met the overall signature requirement, with 145,000 registered voter signatures in hand, well above the 113,000 required. But the initiative also must meet specific signature thresholds in each of the state's 29 state Senate districts. As of last Friday, they had done so in 26 of them.

[For extensive information about the medical marijuana debate, presented in a neutral format, visit MedicalMarijuana.ProCon.org.]

Categories: Ballot Initiatives

Medical Marijuana Update

Medical Marijuana (STDW) - Wed, 04/25/2018 - 16:51

It looks like Utahns will get a chance to vote for medical marijuana in November, medical marijuana bills advance in Missouri and South Carolina, and more.

[image:1 align:left]Illinois

Last Wednesday, the Houes approved medical marijuana for students at school. The House voted to approve House Bill 4870, which would allow parents to administer infused marijuana to their children in elementary and secondary schools. The bill passed by a margin of 99-1. It now goes to the Senate.

Missouri

On Tuesday, Mthe House gave initial approval to a medical marijuana bill. The House gave initial approval to House Bill 1554, which would allow people over 18 dying of terminal diseases or suffering from Alzheimer's, PTSD, and other enumerated conditions to use smokeless marijuana. The bill faces one more House vote before going to the Senate.

South Carolina

Last Thursday, a medical marijuana bill advanced. The House Medical, Military, Public and Municipal Affairs Committee voted 14-3 to approve House Bill 3521, the South Carolina Compassionate Care Act. The bill would allow seriously ill patients to use marijuana to treat their conditions with a recommendation from their doctors. The legislature's crossover deadline has already passed, but this vote, combined with approval by the Senate Medical Affairs Committee on March 29, builds momentum for full passage next year.

Utah

As of last Friday, a medical marijuana initiiative appeared set to qualify for the November ballot. A medical marijuana initiative from the Utah Patients Coalition looks very likely to qualify for the November ballot. While it won't be official until May 15, petitioners appear to have met the overall signature requirement, with 145,000 registered voter signatures in hand, well above the 113,000 required. But the initiative also must meet specific signature thresholds in each of the state's 29 state Senate districts. As of last Friday, they had done so in 26 of them.

[For extensive information about the medical marijuana debate, presented in a neutral format, visit MedicalMarijuana.ProCon.org.]

Categories: Medical Marijuana
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