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Chronicle AM: CA Now a Land of Legal Marijuana Sales, VT to Take Up Legalization Again, More... (1/2/18)

Marijuana (STDW) - Tue, 01/02/2018 - 21:35

California begins the era of legal adult marijuana sales, Maine lawmakers work to get a legalization implementation bill passed, Vermont lawmakers prepare to move on a pending legalization bill, and more.

[image:1 align:right caption:true]Marijuana Policy

California Legal Adult Marijuana Sales Begin. The nation's most populous state ushered in the era of legal, non-medicinal marijuana sales on Monday, with some 88 stores scattered across the state licensed, permitted, and open for business on day one. At Harborside in Oakland, hundreds of people lined up to be the first to buy legal weed. At Solful in Sebastopol, long lines of customers waited patiently for their chance to make a historic purchase. Similar scenes were reported around the state in localities where shops were open.

Maine Public Hearing on Marijuana Legalization Set for Friday. The legislature's Marijuana Legalization Implementation Committee will hold a hearing Friday to seek public input, committee chair Teresa Pierce (D-Falmouth) announced Tuesday. The hearing comes as legislators attempt to craft a legalization implementation bill that Tea Party Gov. Paul LePage (R) will not veto, as he did with the bill last year.

Vermont Lawmakers Will Resume Marijuana Legalization Effort This Week. Legislators are expected to take up the revised marijuana legalization bill, Senate Bill 22, passed by the Senate last year, but not taken up by the House during the one-day veto session last year. Gov. Phil Scott (R) had vetoed the bill earlier, but lawmakers made changes designed to assuage him, and now it's only a House vote away from passage. The bill would legalize the possession and cultivation of small amounts of pot, but not allow retail sales.

Heroin and Prescription Opioids

Georgia Prescription Drug Monitoring Law Goes into Effect. Under a measure passed last year, House Bill 249, anyone writing prescriptions in the state must now participate in the state's Prescription Drug Monitoring Program. Before the law went into effect Monday, only about 10% of the state's doctors were participating. Doctors who fail to sign up to the program or fail to maintain records could be subject to penalties up to losing their medical licenses.

Asset Forfeiture

Hawaii Asset Forfeiture Reform Delayed By Lack of Audit of Police Seizures. In 2016, the legislature passed a bill that lead to an audit of police seizures as a preamble to reforming the state's asset forfeiture laws. That audit was supposed to be done before last year's legislative session, but that didn't happen. But a shakeup in the State Auditor's Office combined with turnover and other internal policy changes have delayed the release of the asset forfeiture analysis, which could cause delays in passing significant reform. Rep. Joy Buenaventura (D-Honolulu), who authored the original bill, said she plans to refile the bill in hopes of lighting a fire under the auditor's office.

Categories: Marijuana

US CA: For Marijuana Users, It's High Times As California Makes

Top Stories (MAP) - Tue, 01/02/2018 - 08:00
Los Angeles Times, 02 Jan 2018 - "Groove on! Groove on!" blared from speakers outside a gray warehouse in Santa Ana. Inside, a line of 60 people snaked through the shop, waiting to be helped by a budtender. "We were bombarded!" said Robert Taft Jr., founder of the marijuana dispensary 420 Central.
Categories: Latest News

US CA: State Pot Bureau Ready To Enforce California's New Marijuana

Top Stories (MAP) - Tue, 01/02/2018 - 08:00
Los Angeles Times, 02 Jan 2018 - The state has issued 104 licenses for retail stores to sell marijuana for recreational use in California and 239 other applications for those permits are pending, officials said Tuesday. An official with the state Bureau of Cannabis Control added that the agency is prepared to begin taking enforcement action against pot shops that are not properly licensed.
Categories: Latest News

Canada: Ottawa Targets Black A And Grey A Markets With Legal Cannabis

Top Stories (MAP) - Tue, 01/02/2018 - 08:00
Globe and Mail, 02 Jan 2018 - The legalization of cannabis in coming months will offer a clear opportunity for provinces to shut down the black market for the drug and put an end to any notion there are still "grey" areas in Canadian law, top Liberal officials said. In a joint interview, federal Health Minister Ginette Petitpas Taylor and her parliamentary secretary, former Toronto police chief Bill Blair, said the new regime for legal marijuana will vary by province, as different rules are being put in place for distribution and retail.
Categories: Latest News

Canada: Ottawa Targets Black A And Grey A Markets With Legal Cannabis

Canada (MAP) - Tue, 01/02/2018 - 08:00
Globe and Mail, 02 Jan 2018 - The legalization of cannabis in coming months will offer a clear opportunity for provinces to shut down the black market for the drug and put an end to any notion there are still "grey" areas in Canadian law, top Liberal officials said. In a joint interview, federal Health Minister Ginette Petitpas Taylor and her parliamentary secretary, former Toronto police chief Bill Blair, said the new regime for legal marijuana will vary by province, as different rules are being put in place for distribution and retail.
Categories: Canada

US CA: Recreational Marijuana Is Legal. But Smoking In Public And

Top Stories (MAP) - Tue, 01/02/2018 - 08:00
Los Angeles Times, 02 Jan 2018 - As Los Angeles moves toward allowing the sale of recreational marijuana, joining cities across the state in the newly legal enterprise, police here offered a stern word of caution. Yes, recreational pot will be legal to sell (and buy, and consume, and cultivate). But there are limits. And the Los Angeles Police Department will help enforce them.
Categories: Latest News

US CA: Recreational Pot Sales Roll Out In California, With

Top Stories (MAP) - Mon, 01/01/2018 - 08:00
Hartford Courant, 01 Jan 2018 - Legal sale of recreational marijuana began in California on Monday with fanfare, and some anxiety. Companies began selling pot in a relatively small number of businesses Monday, with more expected to join in the coming days and weeks.
Categories: Latest News

Canada: Cannabis Growers Face Hefty Pesticide Fines

Top Stories (MAP) - Mon, 01/01/2018 - 08:00
Globe and Mail, 01 Jan 2018 - Licensed marijuana producers caught using banned chemicals could pay up to $1-million Federally regulated marijuana companies caught using banned pesticides that put consumers' health at risk will now face fines of up to $1-million per violation, The Globe and Mail has learned.
Categories: Latest News

Canada: Cannabis Growers Face Hefty Pesticide Fines

Canada (MAP) - Mon, 01/01/2018 - 08:00
Globe and Mail, 01 Jan 2018 - Licensed marijuana producers caught using banned chemicals could pay up to $1-million Federally regulated marijuana companies caught using banned pesticides that put consumers' health at risk will now face fines of up to $1-million per violation, The Globe and Mail has learned.
Categories: Canada

One Day Left to Make a Tax-Deductible (or other) Donation in 2017!

Drug War Chronicle - Sun, 12/31/2017 - 15:42

Dear Reformer,

There's just one day left to make a tax-deductible (or other) donation in 2017. If you're doing more giving this year, would you include us among the organizations you support?

[image:1 align:left caption:true]Your tax-deductible donation for our programs, or your non-deductible donation for our specifically US legislative work, will help us take on the challenges drug policy and reformers face today:

Thanks to contributions from our members, StoptheDrugWar.org has fought this fight for 24 years. Please visit our updated About page, our expanded Reform Global Drug Policy page and our just-published Philippines page to learn about the unique role we play in drug policy.

Click here for Issue 1,000 of our Drug War Chronicle newsletter, including Phil Smith's Biggest Domestic Drug Policy Stories and Biggest International Drug Policy Stories of the Past Twenty Years.

[image:2 align:right]The challenges we're facing today are more urgent than ever, and we need your support to meet those challenges. We need to press supportive members of Congress to stand up, and our opponents to back down. We need to spotlight the administration's actions in the media. And we need to press our case in Washington, in the states and at the UN. Will you donate to StoptheDrugWar.org today to help?

    Visit https://stopthedrugwar.org/donate to give by credit card or PayPal. If you want to donate by mail, send your check or money order to P.O. Box 9853, Washington, DC 20016. Tax-deductible donations should be made payable to DRCNet Foundation, our 501(c)(3) nonprofit; or non-deductible donations should be payable to Drug Reform Coordination Network, our 501(c)(4) lobbying nonprofit. Visit https://stopthedrugwar.org/about to read more about our programs, for info on how to donate stocks, and for other info.

    We couldn't have done this without you, and we need your support to continue it in 2018. I hope you'll take a moment to renew your support or become a new member of our organization at this dangerous and critical, but still promising time in the issue.

    Thank you for your support!

    Sincerely,

    David Borden, Executive Director
    StoptheDrugWar.org
    P.O. Box 9853, Washington, DC 20016
    http://stopthedrugwar.org

    Categories: Latest News

    Happy New Year! Legal Adult Marijuana Sales in the World's Largest Pot Market Start Monday [FEATURE]

    Drug War Chronicle - Sun, 12/31/2017 - 03:34

    The world's largest legal marijuana economy gets underway on January 1, as California's voter-approved law legalizing recreational marijuana commerce goes into effect. It's been legal to possess and grow small amounts of weed since shortly after votes passed Prop 64 in November 2016, but as of New Year's Day, we see the unleashing of what is expected to be a $7 billion a year state cannabis industry.

    [image:1 align:right caption:true]But in a state of 39 million, only a few dozen shops are expected to be open for business on day one, and major cities such as Los Angeles and San Francisco won't be among them. That's because sellers have to have both a local permit and a state license, and few localities have completed their permitting procedures. San Francisco is among those  but it's still not quite going to be ready on day one. Expect recreational marijuana sales to begin there within a matter of days, though.

    "It is going to take a while to get these businesses up and running," said Lori Ajax, who runs the California Bureau of Cannabis Control. "We're asking people to be patient."

    Among the major cities that will have recreational pot shops open on day one are Berkeley, Oakland, San Diego, and San Jose. This interactive map charts all of the approximately 40 shops that will be open on January 1.

    According to the Bureau of Cannabis Control, San Diego and San Jose will have the most stores open, with seven each, while two will be open in Berkeley and one in Oakland. Other pot shops open on January 1 are scattered across the state, from Mt. Shasta, Shasta Lake, Eureka, and Ukiah in the north, down to Santa Cruz on the coast, Palm Springs in the Southern California interior, and Woodlake, the only shop open in the entire Central Valley.

    Medical marijuana dispensaries that have not applied for and received licenses for recreational marijuana sales will remain limited to serving customers with patient IDs.

    While January 1 marks the beginning of the era of recreational marijuana sales, that doesn't mean California is turning into the Wild West of weed. The state has a reputation for being highly regulated, and that's no different when it comes to marijuana. Here are some of the things you can't do with legal marijuana in the Golden State:

    • You can't purchase or possess more than an ounce, unless it's from your personal grow.
    • You can't smoke it in public in most places, including bars and restaurants. Anywhere cigarette smoking is prohibited, pot smoking is prohibited. And if you're a renter, your landlord can ban pot smoking on the premises.
    • You can't get stoned while driving. Getting caught toking up behind the wheel will get you a $75 ticket, but if the cops think you are too high, you could also end up getting busted for driving under the influence, and that's a whole lot more than a $75 ticket.
    • You can't use marijuana's state-legal status to prevent your employer for firing you for smoking pot, even off the job.

    People purchasing legal recreational marijuana will be contributing mightily to the state's coffers. In addition to the state sales tax of 8% and any local sales taxes -- some localities plan sales taxes of up to 10% -- a 15% excise tax on wholesale purchases by retailers will be passed on to consumers. This could end up putting a billion dollars a year in the state and local treasuries.

    It could also make the state's existing black market more attractive to consumers. If Californians accustomed to buying their weed in the informal sector are faced with higher prices in shops than they can get from the guy down the street, they might just stay with the guy down the street.

    And product shortages could also drive up prices, at least in the short run. While the state produces massive amounts of marijuana -- an estimated 13.5 million pounds each year -- up to 80% of that is destined for the black market, either for export to prohibitionist states or sold informally in-state. With permitting and licensing of producers for the legal recreational market at a very early stage, supply bottlenecks are likely to develop, leading to empty shelves, as they did in Nevada in 2017.

    Still, California is now entering a Brave New World of legal marijuana. And with the nation's most populous state embracing legalization, there is probably no going back, regardless of what Washington thinks.

    Categories: Latest News

    Happy New Year! Legal Adult Marijuana Sales in the World's Largest Pot Market Start Monday [FEATURE]

    Marijuana (STDW) - Sun, 12/31/2017 - 03:34

    The world's largest legal marijuana economy gets underway on January 1, as California's voter-approved law legalizing recreational marijuana commerce goes into effect. It's been legal to possess and grow small amounts of weed since shortly after votes passed Prop 64 in November 2016, but as of New Year's Day, we see the unleashing of what is expected to be a $7 billion a year state cannabis industry.

    [image:1 align:right caption:true]But in a state of 39 million, only a few dozen shops are expected to be open for business on day one, and major cities such as Los Angeles and San Francisco won't be among them. That's because sellers have to have both a local permit and a state license, and few localities have completed their permitting procedures. San Francisco is among those  but it's still not quite going to be ready on day one. Expect recreational marijuana sales to begin there within a matter of days, though.

    "It is going to take a while to get these businesses up and running," said Lori Ajax, who runs the California Bureau of Cannabis Control. "We're asking people to be patient."

    Among the major cities that will have recreational pot shops open on day one are Berkeley, Oakland, San Diego, and San Jose. This interactive map charts all of the approximately 40 shops that will be open on January 1.

    According to the Bureau of Cannabis Control, San Diego and San Jose will have the most stores open, with seven each, while two will be open in Berkeley and one in Oakland. Other pot shops open on January 1 are scattered across the state, from Mt. Shasta, Shasta Lake, Eureka, and Ukiah in the north, down to Santa Cruz on the coast, Palm Springs in the Southern California interior, and Woodlake, the only shop open in the entire Central Valley.

    Medical marijuana dispensaries that have not applied for and received licenses for recreational marijuana sales will remain limited to serving customers with patient IDs.

    While January 1 marks the beginning of the era of recreational marijuana sales, that doesn't mean California is turning into the Wild West of weed. The state has a reputation for being highly regulated, and that's no different when it comes to marijuana. Here are some of the things you can't do with legal marijuana in the Golden State:

    • You can't purchase or possess more than an ounce, unless it's from your personal grow.
    • You can't smoke it in public in most places, including bars and restaurants. Anywhere cigarette smoking is prohibited, pot smoking is prohibited. And if you're a renter, your landlord can ban pot smoking on the premises.
    • You can't get stoned while driving. Getting caught toking up behind the wheel will get you a $75 ticket, but if the cops think you are too high, you could also end up getting busted for driving under the influence, and that's a whole lot more than a $75 ticket.
    • You can't use marijuana's state-legal status to prevent your employer for firing you for smoking pot, even off the job.

    People purchasing legal recreational marijuana will be contributing mightily to the state's coffers. In addition to the state sales tax of 8% and any local sales taxes -- some localities plan sales taxes of up to 10% -- a 15% excise tax on wholesale purchases by retailers will be passed on to consumers. This could end up putting a billion dollars a year in the state and local treasuries.

    It could also make the state's existing black market more attractive to consumers. If Californians accustomed to buying their weed in the informal sector are faced with higher prices in shops than they can get from the guy down the street, they might just stay with the guy down the street.

    And product shortages could also drive up prices, at least in the short run. While the state produces massive amounts of marijuana -- an estimated 13.5 million pounds each year -- up to 80% of that is destined for the black market, either for export to prohibitionist states or sold informally in-state. With permitting and licensing of producers for the legal recreational market at a very early stage, supply bottlenecks are likely to develop, leading to empty shelves, as they did in Nevada in 2017.

    Still, California is now entering a Brave New World of legal marijuana. And with the nation's most populous state embracing legalization, there is probably no going back, regardless of what Washington thinks.

    Categories: Marijuana

    Happy New Year! Legal Adult Marijuana Sales in the World's Largest Pot Market Start Monday [FEATURE]

    Ballot Measures (STDW) - Sun, 12/31/2017 - 03:34

    The world's largest legal marijuana economy gets underway on January 1, as California's voter-approved law legalizing recreational marijuana commerce goes into effect. It's been legal to possess and grow small amounts of weed since shortly after votes passed Prop 64 in November 2016, but as of New Year's Day, we see the unleashing of what is expected to be a $7 billion a year state cannabis industry.

    [image:1 align:right caption:true]But in a state of 39 million, only a few dozen shops are expected to be open for business on day one, and major cities such as Los Angeles and San Francisco won't be among them. That's because sellers have to have both a local permit and a state license, and few localities have completed their permitting procedures. San Francisco is among those  but it's still not quite going to be ready on day one. Expect recreational marijuana sales to begin there within a matter of days, though.

    "It is going to take a while to get these businesses up and running," said Lori Ajax, who runs the California Bureau of Cannabis Control. "We're asking people to be patient."

    Among the major cities that will have recreational pot shops open on day one are Berkeley, Oakland, San Diego, and San Jose. This interactive map charts all of the approximately 40 shops that will be open on January 1.

    According to the Bureau of Cannabis Control, San Diego and San Jose will have the most stores open, with seven each, while two will be open in Berkeley and one in Oakland. Other pot shops open on January 1 are scattered across the state, from Mt. Shasta, Shasta Lake, Eureka, and Ukiah in the north, down to Santa Cruz on the coast, Palm Springs in the Southern California interior, and Woodlake, the only shop open in the entire Central Valley.

    Medical marijuana dispensaries that have not applied for and received licenses for recreational marijuana sales will remain limited to serving customers with patient IDs.

    While January 1 marks the beginning of the era of recreational marijuana sales, that doesn't mean California is turning into the Wild West of weed. The state has a reputation for being highly regulated, and that's no different when it comes to marijuana. Here are some of the things you can't do with legal marijuana in the Golden State:

    • You can't purchase or possess more than an ounce, unless it's from your personal grow.
    • You can't smoke it in public in most places, including bars and restaurants. Anywhere cigarette smoking is prohibited, pot smoking is prohibited. And if you're a renter, your landlord can ban pot smoking on the premises.
    • You can't get stoned while driving. Getting caught toking up behind the wheel will get you a $75 ticket, but if the cops think you are too high, you could also end up getting busted for driving under the influence, and that's a whole lot more than a $75 ticket.
    • You can't use marijuana's state-legal status to prevent your employer for firing you for smoking pot, even off the job.

    People purchasing legal recreational marijuana will be contributing mightily to the state's coffers. In addition to the state sales tax of 8% and any local sales taxes -- some localities plan sales taxes of up to 10% -- a 15% excise tax on wholesale purchases by retailers will be passed on to consumers. This could end up putting a billion dollars a year in the state and local treasuries.

    It could also make the state's existing black market more attractive to consumers. If Californians accustomed to buying their weed in the informal sector are faced with higher prices in shops than they can get from the guy down the street, they might just stay with the guy down the street.

    And product shortages could also drive up prices, at least in the short run. While the state produces massive amounts of marijuana -- an estimated 13.5 million pounds each year -- up to 80% of that is destined for the black market, either for export to prohibitionist states or sold informally in-state. With permitting and licensing of producers for the legal recreational market at a very early stage, supply bottlenecks are likely to develop, leading to empty shelves, as they did in Nevada in 2017.

    Still, California is now entering a Brave New World of legal marijuana. And with the nation's most populous state embracing legalization, there is probably no going back, regardless of what Washington thinks.

    Categories: Ballot Initiatives

    Happy New Year! Legal Adult Marijuana Sales in the World's Largest Pot Market Start Monday [FEATURE]

    Top Stories (STDW) - Sun, 12/31/2017 - 03:34

    The world's largest legal marijuana economy gets underway on January 1, as California's voter-approved law legalizing recreational marijuana commerce goes into effect. It's been legal to possess and grow small amounts of weed since shortly after votes passed Prop 64 in November 2016, but as of New Year's Day, we see the unleashing of what is expected to be a $7 billion a year state cannabis industry.

    [image:1 align:right caption:true]But in a state of 39 million, only a few dozen shops are expected to be open for business on day one, and major cities such as Los Angeles and San Francisco won't be among them. That's because sellers have to have both a local permit and a state license, and few localities have completed their permitting procedures. San Francisco is among those  but it's still not quite going to be ready on day one. Expect recreational marijuana sales to begin there within a matter of days, though.

    "It is going to take a while to get these businesses up and running," said Lori Ajax, who runs the California Bureau of Cannabis Control. "We're asking people to be patient."

    Among the major cities that will have recreational pot shops open on day one are Berkeley, Oakland, San Diego, and San Jose. This interactive map charts all of the approximately 40 shops that will be open on January 1.

    According to the Bureau of Cannabis Control, San Diego and San Jose will have the most stores open, with seven each, while two will be open in Berkeley and one in Oakland. Other pot shops open on January 1 are scattered across the state, from Mt. Shasta, Shasta Lake, Eureka, and Ukiah in the north, down to Santa Cruz on the coast, Palm Springs in the Southern California interior, and Woodlake, the only shop open in the entire Central Valley.

    Medical marijuana dispensaries that have not applied for and received licenses for recreational marijuana sales will remain limited to serving customers with patient IDs.

    While January 1 marks the beginning of the era of recreational marijuana sales, that doesn't mean California is turning into the Wild West of weed. The state has a reputation for being highly regulated, and that's no different when it comes to marijuana. Here are some of the things you can't do with legal marijuana in the Golden State:

    • You can't purchase or possess more than an ounce, unless it's from your personal grow.
    • You can't smoke it in public in most places, including bars and restaurants. Anywhere cigarette smoking is prohibited, pot smoking is prohibited. And if you're a renter, your landlord can ban pot smoking on the premises.
    • You can't get stoned while driving. Getting caught toking up behind the wheel will get you a $75 ticket, but if the cops think you are too high, you could also end up getting busted for driving under the influence, and that's a whole lot more than a $75 ticket.
    • You can't use marijuana's state-legal status to prevent your employer for firing you for smoking pot, even off the job.

    People purchasing legal recreational marijuana will be contributing mightily to the state's coffers. In addition to the state sales tax of 8% and any local sales taxes -- some localities plan sales taxes of up to 10% -- a 15% excise tax on wholesale purchases by retailers will be passed on to consumers. This could end up putting a billion dollars a year in the state and local treasuries.

    It could also make the state's existing black market more attractive to consumers. If Californians accustomed to buying their weed in the informal sector are faced with higher prices in shops than they can get from the guy down the street, they might just stay with the guy down the street.

    And product shortages could also drive up prices, at least in the short run. While the state produces massive amounts of marijuana -- an estimated 13.5 million pounds each year -- up to 80% of that is destined for the black market, either for export to prohibitionist states or sold informally in-state. With permitting and licensing of producers for the legal recreational market at a very early stage, supply bottlenecks are likely to develop, leading to empty shelves, as they did in Nevada in 2017.

    Still, California is now entering a Brave New World of legal marijuana. And with the nation's most populous state embracing legalization, there is probably no going back, regardless of what Washington thinks.

    Categories: Latest News

    Happy New Year! Legal Adult Marijuana Sales in the World's Largest Pot Market Start Monday [FEATURE]

    Medical Marijuana (STDW) - Sun, 12/31/2017 - 03:34

    The world's largest legal marijuana economy gets underway on January 1, as California's voter-approved law legalizing recreational marijuana commerce goes into effect. It's been legal to possess and grow small amounts of weed since shortly after votes passed Prop 64 in November 2016, but as of New Year's Day, we see the unleashing of what is expected to be a $7 billion a year state cannabis industry.

    [image:1 align:right caption:true]But in a state of 39 million, only a few dozen shops are expected to be open for business on day one, and major cities such as Los Angeles and San Francisco won't be among them. That's because sellers have to have both a local permit and a state license, and few localities have completed their permitting procedures. San Francisco is among those  but it's still not quite going to be ready on day one. Expect recreational marijuana sales to begin there within a matter of days, though.

    "It is going to take a while to get these businesses up and running," said Lori Ajax, who runs the California Bureau of Cannabis Control. "We're asking people to be patient."

    Among the major cities that will have recreational pot shops open on day one are Berkeley, Oakland, San Diego, and San Jose. This interactive map charts all of the approximately 40 shops that will be open on January 1.

    According to the Bureau of Cannabis Control, San Diego and San Jose will have the most stores open, with seven each, while two will be open in Berkeley and one in Oakland. Other pot shops open on January 1 are scattered across the state, from Mt. Shasta, Shasta Lake, Eureka, and Ukiah in the north, down to Santa Cruz on the coast, Palm Springs in the Southern California interior, and Woodlake, the only shop open in the entire Central Valley.

    Medical marijuana dispensaries that have not applied for and received licenses for recreational marijuana sales will remain limited to serving customers with patient IDs.

    While January 1 marks the beginning of the era of recreational marijuana sales, that doesn't mean California is turning into the Wild West of weed. The state has a reputation for being highly regulated, and that's no different when it comes to marijuana. Here are some of the things you can't do with legal marijuana in the Golden State:

    • You can't purchase or possess more than an ounce, unless it's from your personal grow.
    • You can't smoke it in public in most places, including bars and restaurants. Anywhere cigarette smoking is prohibited, pot smoking is prohibited. And if you're a renter, your landlord can ban pot smoking on the premises.
    • You can't get stoned while driving. Getting caught toking up behind the wheel will get you a $75 ticket, but if the cops think you are too high, you could also end up getting busted for driving under the influence, and that's a whole lot more than a $75 ticket.
    • You can't use marijuana's state-legal status to prevent your employer for firing you for smoking pot, even off the job.

    People purchasing legal recreational marijuana will be contributing mightily to the state's coffers. In addition to the state sales tax of 8% and any local sales taxes -- some localities plan sales taxes of up to 10% -- a 15% excise tax on wholesale purchases by retailers will be passed on to consumers. This could end up putting a billion dollars a year in the state and local treasuries.

    It could also make the state's existing black market more attractive to consumers. If Californians accustomed to buying their weed in the informal sector are faced with higher prices in shops than they can get from the guy down the street, they might just stay with the guy down the street.

    And product shortages could also drive up prices, at least in the short run. While the state produces massive amounts of marijuana -- an estimated 13.5 million pounds each year -- up to 80% of that is destined for the black market, either for export to prohibitionist states or sold informally in-state. With permitting and licensing of producers for the legal recreational market at a very early stage, supply bottlenecks are likely to develop, leading to empty shelves, as they did in Nevada in 2017.

    Still, California is now entering a Brave New World of legal marijuana. And with the nation's most populous state embracing legalization, there is probably no going back, regardless of what Washington thinks.

    Categories: Medical Marijuana

    Chronicle AM: CA Legal Marijuana Sales Begin Monday, Reps Ask FDA to Rethink Kratom, More... (12/29/17)

    Drug War Chronicle - Fri, 12/29/2017 - 22:01

    The world's largest legal marijuana market is about to open for business, a New Hampshire legalization bill should get a vote next Wednesday, federal representatives ask the FDA to back away from its public health warning on kratom, and more.

    [image:1 align:left]Marijuana Policy

    California Legal Recreational Marijuana Sales Begin Monday. As of 6:00am January 1, the sale of marijuana to adults 21 and over is legal. But because of permitting and licensing requirements, fewer than four dozen pot shops will be open for business on day one of the new era. Cities that will see legal sales on Monday include Berkeley, Oakland, San Diego, and San Jose. Neither Los Angeles nor San Francisco will be ready on day one, but should have shops open within days.

    New Hampshire House to Vote on Legalization Bill Wednesday. The House is expected to take up a legalization bill, House Bill 656, on Wednesday. Earlier the House Criminal Justice and Public Safety Committee recommended against the bill's passage, but the House isn't bound by that recommendation. The bill is set to see an amendment that should help its passage: The proposed change would remove language on taxation and regulation of sales and simply allow adults to grow and possess small amounts of marijuana.

    Medical Marijuana

    Florida Judge Halts License to Black Farmer. A Tallahassee judge has ordered state officials to halt the issuance of a medical marijuana license to a black farmer, one of ten licenses set aside for growers who were members of the Black Farmers and Agriculturalists Association-Florida Chapter. The black farmers had successfully argued that the state's law had squeezed them out, so the legislature approved a bill that guaranteed them a piece of the action. But another black farmer, who was not a member of the group, sued, and now the judge has ruled that the arrangement violates the state's ban on laws that grant special privileges to private corporations.

    Indiana CBD for All Bill Filed. Sen. Jim Tomes (R-Wadesville) filed Senate Bill 214 on Wednesday. The bill would legalize the sale and possession of CBD oil in the state. The bill accomplishes this by removing CBD from the state's list of controlled substances. The bill is not yet available on the legislative website.

    Kratom

    Lawmakers Ask FDA to Lift Public Health Warning on Kratom. Rep. Jared Polis (D-CO) and 17 other lawmakers have asked the Food & Drug Administration to lift its public health warning on kratom, which he called "a natural alternative to opioids." The letter says: "The beneficial potential, safety, and efficacy of kratom has been discussed, studied, clinically researched and found to be as safe as coffee. We have heard from many constituents who have used kratom to successfully end their dependence on dangerous opioids, and maintaining legal access to kratom is important for many Americans to maintain sobriety."

    Categories: Latest News

    Chronicle AM: CA Legal Marijuana Sales Begin Monday, Reps Ask FDA to Rethink Kratom, More... (12/29/17)

    Marijuana (STDW) - Fri, 12/29/2017 - 22:01

    The world's largest legal marijuana market is about to open for business, a New Hampshire legalization bill should get a vote next Wednesday, federal representatives ask the FDA to back away from its public health warning on kratom, and more.

    [image:1 align:left]Marijuana Policy

    California Legal Recreational Marijuana Sales Begin Monday. As of 6:00am January 1, the sale of marijuana to adults 21 and over is legal. But because of permitting and licensing requirements, fewer than four dozen pot shops will be open for business on day one of the new era. Cities that will see legal sales on Monday include Berkeley, Oakland, San Diego, and San Jose. Neither Los Angeles nor San Francisco will be ready on day one, but should have shops open within days.

    New Hampshire House to Vote on Legalization Bill Wednesday. The House is expected to take up a legalization bill, House Bill 656, on Wednesday. Earlier the House Criminal Justice and Public Safety Committee recommended against the bill's passage, but the House isn't bound by that recommendation. The bill is set to see an amendment that should help its passage: The proposed change would remove language on taxation and regulation of sales and simply allow adults to grow and possess small amounts of marijuana.

    Medical Marijuana

    Florida Judge Halts License to Black Farmer. A Tallahassee judge has ordered state officials to halt the issuance of a medical marijuana license to a black farmer, one of ten licenses set aside for growers who were members of the Black Farmers and Agriculturalists Association-Florida Chapter. The black farmers had successfully argued that the state's law had squeezed them out, so the legislature approved a bill that guaranteed them a piece of the action. But another black farmer, who was not a member of the group, sued, and now the judge has ruled that the arrangement violates the state's ban on laws that grant special privileges to private corporations.

    Indiana CBD for All Bill Filed. Sen. Jim Tomes (R-Wadesville) filed Senate Bill 214 on Wednesday. The bill would legalize the sale and possession of CBD oil in the state. The bill accomplishes this by removing CBD from the state's list of controlled substances. The bill is not yet available on the legislative website.

    Kratom

    Lawmakers Ask FDA to Lift Public Health Warning on Kratom. Rep. Jared Polis (D-CO) and 17 other lawmakers have asked the Food & Drug Administration to lift its public health warning on kratom, which he called "a natural alternative to opioids." The letter says: "The beneficial potential, safety, and efficacy of kratom has been discussed, studied, clinically researched and found to be as safe as coffee. We have heard from many constituents who have used kratom to successfully end their dependence on dangerous opioids, and maintaining legal access to kratom is important for many Americans to maintain sobriety."

    Categories: Marijuana

    Chronicle AM: CA Legal Marijuana Sales Begin Monday, Reps Ask FDA to Rethink Kratom, More... (12/29/17)

    Medical Marijuana (STDW) - Fri, 12/29/2017 - 22:01

    The world's largest legal marijuana market is about to open for business, a New Hampshire legalization bill should get a vote next Wednesday, federal representatives ask the FDA to back away from its public health warning on kratom, and more.

    [image:1 align:left]Marijuana Policy

    California Legal Recreational Marijuana Sales Begin Monday. As of 6:00am January 1, the sale of marijuana to adults 21 and over is legal. But because of permitting and licensing requirements, fewer than four dozen pot shops will be open for business on day one of the new era. Cities that will see legal sales on Monday include Berkeley, Oakland, San Diego, and San Jose. Neither Los Angeles nor San Francisco will be ready on day one, but should have shops open within days.

    New Hampshire House to Vote on Legalization Bill Wednesday. The House is expected to take up a legalization bill, House Bill 656, on Wednesday. Earlier the House Criminal Justice and Public Safety Committee recommended against the bill's passage, but the House isn't bound by that recommendation. The bill is set to see an amendment that should help its passage: The proposed change would remove language on taxation and regulation of sales and simply allow adults to grow and possess small amounts of marijuana.

    Medical Marijuana

    Florida Judge Halts License to Black Farmer. A Tallahassee judge has ordered state officials to halt the issuance of a medical marijuana license to a black farmer, one of ten licenses set aside for growers who were members of the Black Farmers and Agriculturalists Association-Florida Chapter. The black farmers had successfully argued that the state's law had squeezed them out, so the legislature approved a bill that guaranteed them a piece of the action. But another black farmer, who was not a member of the group, sued, and now the judge has ruled that the arrangement violates the state's ban on laws that grant special privileges to private corporations.

    Indiana CBD for All Bill Filed. Sen. Jim Tomes (R-Wadesville) filed Senate Bill 214 on Wednesday. The bill would legalize the sale and possession of CBD oil in the state. The bill accomplishes this by removing CBD from the state's list of controlled substances. The bill is not yet available on the legislative website.

    Kratom

    Lawmakers Ask FDA to Lift Public Health Warning on Kratom. Rep. Jared Polis (D-CO) and 17 other lawmakers have asked the Food & Drug Administration to lift its public health warning on kratom, which he called "a natural alternative to opioids." The letter says: "The beneficial potential, safety, and efficacy of kratom has been discussed, studied, clinically researched and found to be as safe as coffee. We have heard from many constituents who have used kratom to successfully end their dependence on dangerous opioids, and maintaining legal access to kratom is important for many Americans to maintain sobriety."

    Categories: Medical Marijuana

    CN ON: County Has Questions About Pot Legalization

    Marijuana (MAP) - Fri, 12/29/2017 - 08:00
    The Daily Observer, 29 Dec 2017 - Renfrew County councillors have more questions than answers when it comes to the impending legalization of marijuana by both the federal and provincial Liberal governments. Earlier this month, legislation giving the provincial Liberals a monopoly on recreational marijuana sales in Ontario passed at Queen's Park. The bill creates a provincial agency that will distribute and retail pot through storefronts and online. It also creates stiff fines that could top $1 million against companies and people who sell marijuana in defiance of the government monopoly.
    Categories: Marijuana

    CN NS: Local Dispenser Foresees Growing Demand

    Marijuana (MAP) - Fri, 12/29/2017 - 08:00
    The News, 29 Dec 2017 - Legalization of marijuana was a long time coming, but Carl Morgan believes the future is bright for selling the product in Nova Scotia. Morgan is currently the owner of two medical marijuana dispensaries - Scotia Green Inc. on East River Road in New Glasgow and one on Spring Garden Road in Halifax.
    Categories: Marijuana
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